Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-q6bj7 Total loading time: 0.584 Render date: 2022-12-02T03:27:30.006Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

21 - L2 acquisition of English articles by Korean speakers

from Part I - Language acquisition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Chungmin Lee
Affiliation:
Seoul National University
Greg B. Simpson
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
Youngjin Kim
Affiliation:
Ajou University, Republic of Korea
Ping Li
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania State University
Get access

Summary

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate how L2-learners whose L1s lack articles acquire the semantics of articles, with special focus on article use by L1-Korean learners of L2-English. Based on our experimental studies, we argue that article choice in L2-acquisition reflects systematic access to universal semantic features: definiteness, specificity, and partitivity. It is shown that L2-learners associate the with [+specific] and [+partitive] features, which results in non-random error patterns: overuse of the with specific indefinites and partitive indefinites. Our findings provide further evidence that L2 learners' errors are traceable to parameter settings that are not necessarily instantiated in their L1 or L2 – but which are available through UG. The paper also presents evidence that the interlanguage grammar of L2-learners has important parallels to that of child L1-learners in the domain of article semantics, supporting our conclusion that L2-acquisition, like L1-acquisition, is guided by UG.

Introduction

The fact that primary linguistic data under-determine unconscious knowledge of language has been considered strong evidence for postulating Universal Grammar (UG) (Chomsky, 1965, 1986b). While the argument was originally made for first language (L1) acquisition, it also holds for second language (L2) acquisition, with some caveats: if L2-learners' linguistic knowledge is not traceable to either transfer from the L1 or explicit instruction, this provides evidence for the guiding role of UG (for arguments of UG access in L2-acquisition, see Schwartz and Sprouse, 1994, 1996, among others).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×