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Twelve - Subsistence Middlemen Traders and Pre-colonial Globalization in Melanesia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2018

Nicole Boivin
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Institut für Menschheitsgeschichte, Germany
Michael D. Frachetti
Affiliation:
Washington University, St Louis
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Globalization in Prehistory
Contact, Exchange, and the 'People Without History'
, pp. 308 - 334
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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