Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-r5zm4 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-18T21:50:16.964Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Three - Domesticate Dispersal, Human Agency and Connectivity in Island Southeast Asia during the Holocene

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2018

Nicole Boivin
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Institut für Menschheitsgeschichte, Germany
Michael D. Frachetti
Affiliation:
Washington University, St Louis
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Globalization in Prehistory
Contact, Exchange, and the 'People Without History'
, pp. 80 - 101
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anggraeni, . (2012). The Austronesian migration hypothesis as seen from prehistoric settlements on the Karama River, Mamuju, West Sulawesi. Unpublished PhD thesis. Canberra: Australian National University.Google Scholar
Anshari, G., Kershaw, A. P. and van der Kaars, S. (2001). A late Pleistocene and Holocene pollen and charcoal record from peat swamp forest, Lake Sentarum Wildlife Reserve, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 171(3), 213228.Google Scholar
Barker, G. (2013). Rainforest Foraging and Farming in Island Southeast Asia. Cambridge: McDonald Institute Monographs.Google Scholar
Barker, G. and Janowski, M. (2011). Why Cultivate? Anthropological and Archaeological Approaches to Foraging-Farming Transitions in Southeast Asia. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Anthropological Research.Google Scholar
Barker, G. and Richards, M. B. (2013). Foraging-farming transitions in Island Southeast Asia. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, 20(2), 256280.Google Scholar
Barker, G., Lloyd-Smith, L., Barton, H., Cole, F., Hunt, C., Piper, P. J., Rabett, Z. R., Paz, V. and Szabo, K. (2011a). Foraging-farming transitions at the Niah Caves, Sarawak, Borneo. Antiquity, 85(328), 492509.Google Scholar
Barker, G., Hunt, C. and Carlos, J. (2011b). Transitions to farming in Island Southeast Asia: Archaeological, biomolecular and palaeoecological perspectives. In Barker, G. and Janowski, M., eds., Why Cultivate? Anthropological and Archaeological Approaches to Foraging-Farming Transitions in Southeast Asia. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 6174.Google Scholar
Barton, H. (2012). The reversed fortunes of sago and rice, Oryza sativa, in the rainforests of Sarawak, Borneo. Quaternary International, 249, 96104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barton, H. and Denham, T. P. (2011). Prehistoric vegeculture and social life in Island Southeast Asia and Melanesia. In Barker, G. and Janowski, M., eds., Why Cultivate? Anthropological and Archaeological Approaches to Foraging-Farming Transitions in Southeast Asia. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. pp. 1725.Google Scholar
Bates, D. M., Merrick, L. C. and Robinson, R. W. (1995). Minor cucurbits: Benincasa, Lagenaria, Luffa, Schium, and other genera (Cucurbitaceae). In Smartt, J. and Simmonds, N. W., eds., Evolution of Crop Plants. Harlow: Longman, pp. 105111.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (1984–1985). A hypothesis for Austronesian origins. Asian Perspectives, 20, 107117.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2002). Farmers, foragers, languages, genes: The genesis of agricultural societies. In Bellwood, P. and Renfrew, C., eds., Examining the Farming-Language Dispersal Hypothesis. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 1728.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2004). The origins and dispersals of agricultural communities in Southeast Asia. In Glover, I. and Bellwood, P., eds., Southeast Asia: From Prehistory to History. London: RoutledgeCurzon, pp. 2140.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2005). First Farmers. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2007a). Prehistory of the Indo-Malaysian Archipelago. Revised edition. Canberra: ANU EPress.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2007b). Overview. Review feature of ‘First farmers: The origins of agricultural societies’. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 17(1), 8891.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2010). Comment. Current Anthropology, 51, 240241.Google Scholar
Bellwood, P. (2013). First Migrants: Ancient Migration in Global Perspective. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Blust, Robert. (2009). The Austronesian Languages. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.Google Scholar
Bourke, R. M. and Harwood, T. (2009). Food and Agriculture in Papua New Guinea. Canberra: Land Management Group, Australian National University.Google Scholar
Bulbeck, D. (2005). The Guar Kepah human remains. In Majid, Z., ed., The Perak Man and Other Prehistoric Skeletons of Malaysia. Penang: Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, pp. 383423.Google Scholar
Bulbeck, D. (2008). An integrated perspective on the Austronesian diaspora: The switch from cereal agriculture to maritime foraging in the colonisation of Island Southeast Asia. Australian Archaeology, 67(1), 3151.Google Scholar
Datan, I. (1993). Archaeological excavations at Gua Sireh (Serian) and Lubang Angin (Gunung Mulu National Park), Sarawak, Malaysia. The Sarawak Museum Journal, Special Monograph No. 6.Google Scholar
De Langhe, E., Perrier, X., Donohue, M. and Denham, T.P. (2015). The original banana split: Multidisciplinary implications of the generation of African and Pacific Plantains in Island Southeast Asia. Ethnobotany Research and Applications, 14, 299312.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. (2004). The roots of agriculture and arboriculture in New Guinea: Looking beyond Austronesian expansion, Neolithic packages and Indigenous origins. World Archaeology, 36(4), 610620.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. (2005). Envisaging early agriculture in the Highlands of New Guinea: Landscapes, plants and practices. World Archaeology, 37(2), 290306.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. (2010). From domestication histories to regional prehistory: Using plants to re-evaluate early and mid-Holocene interaction between New Guinea and Southeast Asia. Food and History, 8(1), 322.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. (2011). Early agriculture and plant domestication in New Guinea and Island Southeast Asia. Current Anthropology, 52(S4), S379–395.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. (2013). Early farming in Island Southeast Asia: An alternative hypothesis. Antiquity, 87(335), 250257.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. and Donohue, M. (2009). Pre-Austronesian dispersal of banana cultivars west from New Guinea: Linguistic relics from eastern Indonesia. Archaeology in Oceania, 44(1), 1828.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. and Donohue, M. (2012a). Lack of correspondence between Asian-Papuan genetic admixture and Austronesian language dispersal in eastern Indonesia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA), 109(39), E2577.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. and Donohue, M. (2012b). Reconnecting genes, languages and material culture in Island Southeast Asia: Aphorisms on geography and history. Language Dynamics and Change, 2(2), 184211.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P. and Haberle, S. G. (2008). Agricultural emergence and transformation in the Upper Wahgi valley during the Holocene: Theory, method and practice. The Holocene, 18(3), 499514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Denham, T. P., Haberle, S. G., Lentfer, C., Fullagar, R., Field, J., Therin, M., Porch, N. and Winsborough, B. (2003). Origins of agriculture at Kuk Swamp in the Highlands of New Guinea. Science, 301(5630), 189193.Google Scholar
Denham, T. P., Bronk Ramsey, C. and Specht, J. (2012). Dating the appearance of Lapita pottery in the Bismarck Archipelago and its dispersal to Remote Oceania. Archaeology in Oceania, 47(1), 3946.Google Scholar
Diamond, J. and Bellwood, P. (2003). Farmers and their languages: The first expansions. Science, 300(5619), 597603.Google Scholar
Doherty, C., Beavitt, P. and Kurui, E. (2000). Recent observations of rice temper in pottery from Niah and other sites in Sarawak. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 19, 147152.Google Scholar
Donohue, M. and Denham, T. P. (2010). Farming and language in Island Southeast Asia: Reframing Austronesian history. Current Anthropology, 51(2), 223256.Google Scholar
Donohue, M. and Denham, T. P. (In press). Becoming Austronesian: Mechanisms of language dispersal across southern Island Southeast Asia. In Gil, D. and McWhorter, J., eds., Austronesian Undressed. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.Google Scholar
Donohue, M., Denham, T. P. and Oppenheimer, S. (2012a). New methods for historical linguistics? Calibrating a lexicon-based methodology for diffusion vs. subgrouping. Diachronica, 29(4), 505522.Google Scholar
Donohue, M., Denham, T. P. and Oppenheimer, S. (2012b). Consensus and lexicon in historical linguistics: Rejoinder to basic vocabulary and Bayesian phylolinguistics. Diachronica, 29(4), 538546.Google Scholar
Erikson, D. L., Smith, B. D., Clarke, A. C., Sandweiss, D. H. and Tuross, N. (2005). An Asian origin for a 10,000 year-old domesticated plant in the Americas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 102(51), 1831518320.Google Scholar
Fairbairn, A. (2005). An archaeobotanical perspective on Holocene plant use practices in lowland northern New Guinea. World Archaeology, 37(4), 487502.Google Scholar
Fairbairn, A. and Swadling, P. (2005). Re-dating mid-Holocene betelnut (Areca catechu L.) and other plant use at Dongan, Papua New Guinea. Radiocarbon, 47(3), 377382.Google Scholar
Fox, R. B. (1970). The Tabon Caves: Archaeological Explorations and Excavations on Palawan Island, Philippines. Manila: National Museum of the Philippines.Google Scholar
French, B. R. (1986). Food Plants of Papua New Guinea: A Compendium. Privately published book.Google Scholar
Fuller, D. Q., Qin, L., Zheng, Y., Zhao, Z., Chen, X., Hosoya, L. A. and Sun, G. P. (2009). The domestication process and domestication rate in rice: Spikelet bases from the Lower Yangtze. Science, 323(5921), 16071610.Google Scholar
Gillieson, D., Gorecki, P. and Hope, G. (1985). Prehistoric agricultural systems in a lowland swamp, Papua New Guinea. Archaeology in Oceania, 20(1), 3237.Google Scholar
Golson, J. (1977). No room at the top: Agricultural intensification in the New Guinea Highlands. In Allen, J., Golson, J. and Jones, R., eds., Sunda and Sahul: Prehistoric Studies in Southeast Asia, Melanesia and Australia. London: Academic, pp. 601638.Google Scholar
Golson, J. (1991). The New Guinea Highlands on the eve of agriculture. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 11, 8291.Google Scholar
Golson, J. (2002). Gourds in New Guinea, Asia and the Pacific. In Bedford, S., Sand, C. and Burley, D., eds., Fifty Years in the Field: Essays in Honour and Celebration of Richard Shutler Jr.’s Archaeological Career. New Zealand Archaeological Journal Monograph 25. Auckland: Auckland Museum, pp. 6978.Google Scholar
Golson, J., Lampert, R. J., Wheeler, J. M. and Ambrose, W. R. (1967). A note on carbon dates for horticulture in the New Guinea Highlands. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 76(3), 369371.Google Scholar
Gonzalez, A., Clark, G., O’Connor, S. and Matisoo-Smith, L. (2013). A 3000 year old dog burial in Timor-Leste. Australian Archaeology, 76(1), 1320.Google Scholar
Gray, R. D., Drummond, A. J., and Greenhill, S. J. (2009). Language phylogenies reveal expansion pulses and pauses in Pacific settlement. Science, 323(5913), 479483.Google Scholar
Green, R. C. (1992). Definitions of the Lapita Cultural Complex and its non-ceramic component. In Galipaud, J. C., ed., Poterie Lapita et peuplement. Noumea: ORSTROM, pp. 720.Google Scholar
Greenhill, S. J. and Gray, R. D. (2012). Basic vocabulary and Bayesian phylolinguistics: Issues of understanding and representation. Diachronica, 29(4), 523537.Google Scholar
Grivet, L., Daniels, C., Glaszman, J. C. and D’Hont, A. (2004). A review of recent molecular genetics evidence for sugarcane evolution and domestication. Ethnobotany Research and Applications, 2, 917.Google Scholar
Harris, D. R. (2007) [1989]. An evolutionary continuum of people-plant interaction. In Denham, T. P. and White, P., eds., The Emergence of Agriculture. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 2644.Google Scholar
Hather, J. G. (1996). The origins of tropical vegeculture: Zingiberaceae, Araceae and Dioscoreaceae in Southeast Asia. In Harris, D. R., ed., The Origins and Spread of Agriculture and Pastoralism in Eurasia. London: UCL Press, pp. 538550.Google Scholar
Hayden, B. (2011). Rice: The first Asian luxury food? In Barker, G. and Janowski, M., eds., Why Cultivate? Anthropological and Archaeological Approaches to Foraging-Farming Transitions in Southeast Asia. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 7594.Google Scholar
Heatubun, C. D., Dransfield, J., Flynn, T., Tjitrosoedirdjo, S. S., Mogea, J. P. and Baker, W. J. (2012). A monograph of the betel nut palms (Areca: Arecaceae) of East Malesia. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 168(2), 147173.Google Scholar
Hill, C., Soares, P., Mormina, M., Macaulay, V., Clarke, D., Blumbach, P. B., Vizuete-Forster, M., Bulbeck, D., Oppenheimer, S. and Richards, M. (2007). A mitochondrial stratigraphy for Island Southeast Asia. American Journal of Human Genetics, 80(1), 2943.Google Scholar
Hung, H. C., Iizuka, Y., Bellwood, P., Nguyen, K. D., Bellina, B., Silapanth, P., Dizon, E., Santiago, R., Datan, I. and Manton, J. H. (2007). Ancient jade maps 3000 years of prehistoric exchange in Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Washington DC), 104(50), 1974519750.Google Scholar
Hung, H. C., Carson, M. T., Bellwood, P., Campos, F. Z., Piper, P. J., Dizon, E., Bolunia, M., Oxenham, M. and Zhang, C. (2011). The first settlement of Remote Oceania: The Philippines to the Marianas. Antiquity, 85(329), 909926.Google Scholar
Hunt, C. O. and Rushworth, G. (2005). Cultivation and human impact at 6000 cal yr. BP in tropical lowland forest at Niah, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Quaternary Research, 64(3), 460468.Google Scholar
Jian, L. and Liu, L. (2006). New evidence for the origins of sedentism and rice domestication in the Lower Yangzi River, China. Antiquity, 80, 355361.Google Scholar
Jinam, T. A., Hong, L. C., Phipps, M. E., Stoneking, M., Ameen, M., Edo, J. HUGO Pan-Asian SNP Consortium and Saitou, N. (2012). Evolutionary history of continental Southeast Asians: ‘Early train’ hypothesis based on genetic analysis of mitochondrial and autosomal DNA data. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 29(11), 35133527.Google Scholar
Kirch, P. V. (1997). The Lapita Peoples: Ancestors of the Oceanic World. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Kistler, L., Montenegro, Á., Smith, B. D., Gifford, J. A., Green, R. E., Newsom, L. A. and Shapiro, B. (2014). Transoceanic drift and the domestication of African bottle gourds in the Americas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(8), 29372941.Google Scholar
Lansing, J. S., Cox, M. P., Downey, S. S., Gabler, B. M., Hallmark, B., Karafet, T. M., Norquest, P., Schoenfelder, J. W., Sudoyo, H., Watkins, J. C. and Hammer, M. F. (2007). Coevolution of languages and genes on the island of Sumba, eastern Indonesia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(41), 1602216026.Google Scholar
Lansing, J. S., Cox, M. P., de Vet, T. A., Downey, S. S., Hallmark, B. and Sudoyo, H. (2011). An ongoing Austronesian expansion in Island Southeast Asia. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 30(3), 262272.Google Scholar
Larson, G., Cucchi, T., Fujita, M., Matisoo-Smith, E., Robins, J., Anderson, A., Rolett, B., Spriggs, M., Dolman, G., Kim, T. H., Thuy, N. T. D., Randi, E., Doherty, M., Due, R. A., Bollt, R., Djubiantono, T., Griffin, B., Intoh, M., Keane, E., Kirch, P., Li, K. T., Morwood, M., Pedriña, L. M., Piper, P. J., Rabett, R. J., Shooter, P., Van den Bergh, G., West, E., Wickler, S., Yuan, J., Cooper, A. and Dobney, K. (2007). Phylogeny and ancient DNA of Sus provides insights into neolithic expansion in Island Southeast Asia and Oceania. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(12), 48344839.Google Scholar
Latinis, D. K. (2000). The development of subsistence system models for Island Southeast Asia and Near Oceania: The nature and role of arboriculture and arboreal-based economies. World Archaeology, 32(1), 4167.Google Scholar
Lewis, H., Paz, V., Lara, M., Barton, H., Piper, P. J., Ochoa, J., Vitales, T., Carlos, A. J., Higham, T., Neri, L., Hernandez, V., Stevenson, J., Robles, E. C., Ragragio, A., Padilla, R., SolheimII, W. and Ronquillo, W. (2008). Terminal Pleistocene to Mid Holocene occupation and an early cremation at Illa Cave, Palawan, Philippines. Antiquity, 82(316), 318335.Google Scholar
Lipson, M., Loh, P. R., Patterson, N., Moorjani, P., Ko, Y. C., Stoneking, M., Berger, B. and Reich, D. (2014). Reconstructing Austronesian population history in Island Southeast Asia. Nature Communications, 5, 4689. doi:10.1038/ncomms5689.Google Scholar
Liu, L., Lee, G. A. and Jiang, L. (2007). Evidence for the early beginning (c. 9000 cal BP) of rice domestication in China: A response. Holocene, 17(8), 10591068.Google Scholar
Malapa, R., Arnau, G., Noyer, J. L. and Lebot, V. (2005). Genetic diversity of the greater yam (Dioscorea alata L.) and relatedness to D. nummularia Lam. and D. transversa Br. as revealed with AFLP markers. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 52(7), 919929.Google Scholar
Matthews, P. (2003). Identification of Benincasa hispida (wax gourd) from the Kana archaeological site, Western Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. Archaeology in Oceania, 38(3), 186191.Google Scholar
Mbida, C. M., Doutrelepont, H., Vrydaghs, L., Swennen, R. L., Swennen, R., Beeckman, H., de Langhe, E. and de Maret, P. (2001). First archaeological evidence of banana cultivation in central Africa during the third millennium before present. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 10(1), 16.Google Scholar
Meacham, W. (1984–1985). On the improbability of Austronesian origins in South China. Asian Perspectives, 20(1), 89106.Google Scholar
Morwood, M. J., Aziz, F., O’Sullivan, P., Hobbs, D. R. and Raza, A. (1999). Archaeological and palaeontological research in central Flores, east Indonesia: Results of fieldwork 1997–98. Antiquity, 73(280), 273286.Google Scholar
Morwood, M. J., Soejono, R. P., Roberts, R. G., Sutikna, T., Turney, C. S. M., Westaway, K. E., Rink, W. J., Zhoa, J. X., van den Bergh, G. D., Due, R. A., Hobbs, D. R., Moore, M. W., Bird, M. I. and Fifield, L. K. (2004). Archaeology and age of a new hominin from flores in eastern Indonesia. Nature, 431(7012), 10871091.Google Scholar
Muke, J and Mandui, H. (2003). In the shadows of Kuk: Evidence for prehistoric agriculture at Kana, Wahgi Valley, Papua New Guinea. Archaeology in Oceania, 38(3), 177185.Google Scholar
Murdock, G. P. (1959). Africa: Its Peoples and Their Culture History. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
O’Connor, S., Spriggs, M. and Veth, P. (2002). Excavation of Lene Hara Cave establishes occupation in East Timor at least 35,000 years ago. Antiquity, 76(291), 4550.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O’Connor, S., Spriggs, M. and Veth, P. (2007). The Archaeology of the Aru Islands, Eastern Indonesia. Canberra: Pandanus Books.Google Scholar
O’Connor, S., Ono, R. and Clarkson, C. (2011). Pelagic fishing at 42,000 years before present and the maritime skills of modern humans. Science, 334(6059), 11171121.Google Scholar
Oliveira, N. (2012). Recovering, analyzing and identifying Colocasia esculenta and Dioscorea spp. from archaeological contexts in Timor-Leste. In Spriggs, M., Addison, D. and Matthews, P. J., ed., Irrigated Taro (Colocasia esculenta) in the Indo-Pacific, Senri Ethnological Studies 78. Osaka: National Museum of Ethnology, pp. 265284.Google Scholar
Oxenham, M. F., Locher, C., Cuong, N. L. and Thuy, N. K. (2002). Identification of Areca catechu (betel nut) residues on the dentitions of Bronze Age inhabitants of Nui Nap, northern Vietnam. Journal of Archaeological Science, 29(9), 909915.Google Scholar
Pawley, A. (2007). The origins of early Lapita culture: The testimony of historical linguistics. In Bedford, S., Sand, C. and Connaughton, S. P., eds., Oceanic Explorations: Lapita and Western Pacific Settlement. Canberra: Australian National University, pp. 1749.Google Scholar
Paz, V. (2002). Island Southeast Asia: Spread or friction zone? In Bellwood, P. and Renfrew, C., eds., Examining the Farming-Language Dispersal Hypothesis. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 275285.Google Scholar
Paz, V. (2005). Rock shelters, caves, and archaeobotany in Island Southeast Asia. Asian Perspectives, 44, 107118.Google Scholar
Paz, V. (2010). Comments to ‘Farming and language in Island Southeast Asia: Reframing Austronesian history’. Current Anthropology, 51, 244.Google Scholar
Perrier, X., De Langhe, E., Donohue, M., Lentfer, C., Vrydaghs, L., Bakry, F., Carreel, F., Hippolyte, I., Horry, J. P., Jenny, C., Lebot, V., Risterucci, A. M., Tomekpe, K., Doutrelepont, H., Ball, T., Manwaring, J., de Maret, P. and Denham, T. P. (2011). Multidisciplinary perspectives on banana (Musa spp.) domestication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(28), 1131111318.Google Scholar
Piper, P. J., Hung, H. C., Campos, F. Z., Bellwood, P. and Santiago, R. (2009). A 4000 year-old introduction of domestic pigs into the Philippine Archipelago: Implications for understanding routes of human migration through Island Southeast Asia and Wallacea. Antiquity, 83(321), 687695.Google Scholar
Powell, J. M. (1970a). The impact of man on the vegetation of the Mount Hagen region, New Guinea. Unpublished PhD thesis, Australian National University.Google Scholar
Powell, J. M. (1970b). The history of agriculture in the New Guinea Highlands. Search, 1, 199200.Google Scholar
Roullier, C., Benoit, L., McKey, D. B. and Lebot, V. (2013). Historical collections reveal patterns of diffusion of sweet potato in Oceania obscured by modern plant movements and recombination. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(6), 22052210.Google Scholar
Sémah, A. M. and Sémah, F. (2012). The rain forest in Java through the Quaternary and its relationships with humans (adaptation, exploitation and impact on the forest). Quaternary International, 249, 120128.Google Scholar
Soares, P., Rito, T., Trejaut, J., Mormina, M., Hill, C., Tinkler-Hundal, E., Braid, M., Clarke, D. J., Loo, J. H., Thomson, N., Denham, T. P., Donohue, M., Macaulay, V., Lin, M., Oppenheimer, S. and Richards, M. B. (2011). Genetic evidence for early Holocene voyaging between Indonesia and Near Oceania. American Journal of Human Genetics, 88, 239247.Google Scholar
Solheim, W. G. (1984). The Nusantao hypothesis: The origin and spread of Austronesian speakers. Asian Perspectives, 26(1), 7788.Google Scholar
Solheim, W. G. (2006). Archaeology and Culture in Southeast Asia: Unraveling the Nusantao. With contributions from D. Bulbeck and A. Flavel. Manila: University of the Philippines Press.Google Scholar
Specht, J., Denham, T. P., Goff, J. and Terrell, J. E. (2014). Deconstructing the Lapita Cultural Complex in the Bismarck Archipelago. Journal of Archaeological Research, 22, 89140.Google Scholar
Spriggs, M. (1996). Early agriculture and what went before in Island Melanesia: Continuity or intrusion? In Harris, D. R., ed., The Origins and Spread of Agriculture and Pastoralism in Eurasia. London: University College London Press, pp. 524537.Google Scholar
Spriggs, M. (1997). The Island Melanesians. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Spriggs, M. (2003). Chronology of the Neolithic transition in Island Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific: A view from 2003. Review of Archaeology, 24(2), 5780.Google Scholar
Spriggs, M. (2007). The Neolithic and Austronesian expansion within Island Southeast Asia and into the Pacific. In Chiu, S. and Sand, C., eds., From Southeast Asia to the Pacific: Archaeological Perspectives on the Austronesian Expansion and the Lapita Cultural Complex. Taipei: Centers for Archaeological Studies Research and for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academica Sinica, pp. 104125.Google Scholar
Spriggs, M. (2010). Comment. Current Anthropology, 51, 245.Google Scholar
Spriggs, M. (2011). Archaeology and the Austronesian expansion: Where are we now? Antiquity, 85(328), 510528.Google Scholar
Sutton, A., Mountain, M. J., Aplin, K., Bulmer, S. and Denham, T. P. (2009). Archaeozoological records for the highlands of New Guinea: A review of current evidence. Australian Archaeology, 69(1), 4158.Google Scholar
Swadling, P., Araho, N. and Ivuyo, B. (1991). Settlements associated with the inland Sepik-Ramu Sea. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 11, 92110.Google Scholar
Szabó, K. A. (2004). Technique and practice: Shell-working in the Western Pacific and Island Southwest Asia. Unpublished PhD thesis, Australian National University.Google Scholar
Szabó, K. A., Brumm, A. and Bellwood, P. (2007). Shell artifact production at 32,000–28,000 BP in Island Southeast Asia: Thinking across media? Current Anthropology, 48(5), 701723.Google Scholar
Tieng, F. S. (2010). Hoabinhian Rocks: An examination of Guar Kepah artifacts from the Heritage Conservation Centre in Jurong. Unpublished MA thesis. Singapore: National University of Singapore.Google Scholar
Trigger, B. (2006). A History of Archaeological Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Vaughan, D. A., Kadowaki, K., Kaga, A. and Toomka, N. (2005). On the phylogeny and biogeography of the Genus Oryza. Breeding Science, 55(2), 113122.Google Scholar
Xu, S., Pugach, I., Stoneking, M., Kayser, M., Jin, L. and HUGO Pan-Asian SNP Consortium. (2012). Genetic dating indicates that the Asian-Papuan admixture through Eastern Indonesia corresponds to the Austronesian expansion. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(12), 45744579.Google Scholar
Yen, D. and McEldowney, P. H. (1991). Dongan plant identifications. Appendix in P. Swadling, N. Araho and B. Ivuyo, Settlements associated with the inland Sepik-Ramu Sea. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 11, 109110.Google Scholar
Zumbroich, T. J. (2008). The origin and diffusion of betel chewing: A synthesis of evidence from South Asia, Southeast Asia and beyond. Journal of Indian Medicine, 1(3), 63116.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×