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18 - Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the giant panda

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 August 2009

Autumn P. Davidson
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology
Thomas W. Baker
Affiliation:
Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences
Chengdong Wang
Affiliation:
Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding
Rong Hou
Affiliation:
Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding
Li Lou
Affiliation:
Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding
David E. Wildt
Affiliation:
Smithsonian National Zoological Park, Washington DC
Anju Zhang
Affiliation:
Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding
Hemin Zhang
Affiliation:
Wildlife Conservation and Research Center for Giant Pandas
Donald L. Janssen
Affiliation:
Zoological Society of San Diego
Susie Ellis
Affiliation:
Conservation Breeding Specialist Group
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Summary

INTRODUCTION

Endoscopy is a minimally invasive method of evaluating the gross appearance of the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal, respiratory and urogenital tracts (Guilford, 1996). Efficient methods of performing endoscopic evaluation of these systems have been developed in small and large animal medicine (Jones, 1997). Besides providing direct visualisation, endoscopy permits obtaining representative biopsy specimens for subsequent histopathological tissue assessments. Video endoscopy allows recorded observations (for retrospective evaluation) as well as group participation by investigators and students, thereby improving both diagnostics and training opportunities.

The original CBSG Biomedical Survey of the giant panda made minimal use of endoscopy, although laparoscopy was used in a few individuals and found to be effective for evaluating abdominal organs, including the uterine cornuae and all ovarian surfaces (see Chapter 4). Other medical findings from this initial survey suggested the need to test other forms of endoscopy for more advanced diagnostic evaluations. Thus the present study was conducted in 2004 at the invitation of the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding. It was a component of a more thorough set of evaluative procedures that included case histories, physical examinations, haematology, blood chemistry, ultrasonography, serology, toxicology, histopathology and faecal analysis of 11 giant pandas. The subject of this chapter exclusively involves the effectiveness of using endoscopy at this same time to examine the gastrointestinal tract of this species.

Type
Chapter
Information
Giant Pandas
Biology, Veterinary Medicine and Management
, pp. 440 - 454
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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References

Gualtieri, M. (2001). Esophagoscopy. Veterinary Clinics of North America Small Animal Practice, ed. L. Melendez, 31, 605–30.Google Scholar
Guilford, W. G. (1996). Gastrointestinal endoscopy. In Strombeck's Small Animal Gastroenterology, 3rd edn, ed. Guilford, W. G., Center, S. A., Strombeck, D. R., Williams, D. A. and Meyers, D. J.. Philadelphia, PA: W. B. Saunders, p. 114.Google Scholar
Jones, B. D. (1997). Incorporating endoscopy into veterinary practice. Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian, 20, 307–12.Google Scholar
Willard, M. D. (2001). Colonoscopy, proctoscopy and ileoscopy. Veterinary Clinics of North America Small Animal Practice, ed. L. Melendez, 31, 657–69.Google Scholar
Zoran, D. L. (2001). Gastroduodenoscopy in the dog and cat. Veterinary Clinics of North America Small Animal Practice, ed. L. Melendez, 31, 631–56.Google Scholar

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