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Book contents

Chapter 25 - The Anthropology of Aging

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 July 2020

Kim A. Collins
Affiliation:
LifePoint Inc, South Carolina
Roger W. Byard
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
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Summary

Aging is a universal process defined as the uninterrupted process of normal development over time that leads to a progressive decline in physiological function and ultimately to death [1]. Age can be measured chronologically, socially, or physiologically. Chronological age is measured in calendar days, months, and years since birth and cannot be determined without a known birth date [2].

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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