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Part IV - Case Studies from Developing Countries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2017

Ademola A. Adenle
Affiliation:
Colorado State University
E. Jane Morris
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Denis J. Murphy
Affiliation:
University of South Wales
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Genetically Modified Organisms in Developing Countries
Risk Analysis and Governance
, pp. 213 - 300
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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