Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.311 Render date: 2021-11-28T10:51:12.389Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Gender and Health Status among Older Adults in Vietnam

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2015

Bussarawan Teerawichitchainan
Affiliation:
Management University
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

Over the last decade, the growing size of Vietnam's older population has prompted the government to pay more attention to the well-being of this group (Bui et al. 2000; Nguyen 1998; VCPFC 2002). The proportion of Vietnamese adults age 60 and above is projected to rise substantially from 8 per cent in 2000 to 13 per cent in 2025 and over 25 per cent by the mid twenty-first century (United Nations 2007a). Female old-age vulnerability has been placed in the forefront of government-funded social programmes to improve the living standards of the old (HelpAge 2007; Mitchell and Khuat 2000; United Nations 2002, 2007b). Influenced by the dominant policy discourse on gender and ageing, Vietnamese policymakers are concerned that older women would be more susceptible than men to various forms of hardship because they tend to experience socioeconomic disadvantage in early life and to be widowed in older years (Giang and Pfau 2007a; Ofstedal et al. 2003).

Recently the disproportionate policy focus on older women's vulnerability has been increasingly criticized for its lack of consistent evidence and for its dismissal of men's potential disadvantages (Knodel and Ofstedal 2003). For example, while women might be inferior to men in the labour market, they are not necessarily more vulnerable in later life since female elders tend to be more protected socially by family and kin network support. These criticisms also extend to the prevailing perspective on gender and health equity which posits that women are more likely than men to have poor health at older ages. The issue is particularly relevant to Vietnam's recent efforts to address the healthcare needs of its older population. While healthcare provision for the elderly, especially for female elders who are less likely to receive pension and health insurance, has been discussed widely in the public sphere, little is known about the extent to which health status in older years varies by gender and what mechanisms lie behind male-female differences (Thanh Nien News 2009; Vietnam News 2008).

Type
Chapter
Information
Gender and Ageing
Southeast Asian Perspectives
, pp. 122 - 149
Publisher: ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×