Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-5qtdt Total loading time: 0.298 Render date: 2022-01-22T09:57:45.157Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Regional Politics, Landed Society and the Coal Industry in North-East England, 1350–1430

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2017

Mark Arvanigian
Affiliation:
California State University, Fresno
Beth Alison Barr
Affiliation:
Beth Allison Barr is Assistant Professor of European Women's History at Baylor University.
James Bothwell
Affiliation:
Dr James Bothwell is Lecturer in Later Medieval English History at the University of Leicester.
Helen Lacey
Affiliation:
College Lecturer in Late Medieval History, Mansfield College, University of Oxford
Christian D. Liddy
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer in History, University of Durham, England.
Get access

Summary

Over the years, historians of the late-medieval English gentry have mapped out several working models to explain the character and behavior of landed society in various localities around the country. While various, two basic models have nonetheless emerged which have served to define the parameters of the debate. On the one hand, some have argued that gentry life was usually dominated by the presence and operation of great aristocratic affinities, which often became stages for the drama of competition between gentry families, and which thereby preoccupied gentry families; they were often left scrambling for fortune and preferment within one or another of the great retinues of the country's increasingly influential baronial families. This view has been challenged by another model for the operation of local landed communities, one which posits a more cohesive, even co-operative, situation in which members of a landed community occasionally put aside mutual antagonisms, instead speaking with a collective voice on matters of local importance. Although they have generally provided the framework for the study of regional landed society, historians in recent years have begun to cast their net beyond these two basic constructions. For example, space has now been made for more significant regional variation, based upon a series of local variables, including but not limited to such factors as a region's geography, its land tenure arrangements, its relative wealth, the presence of one or more great families, royal influence, and the relative ease of financial and/or political advancement. It is upon this final point that this essay will turn, for one such financial variable – the coal industry – was a clear factor in determining the political and financial climate of Northeast England by the latter part of the fourteenth century; it will serve here as a convenient prism as we seek to place the region's gentry within its political economy. Because of the often scant nature of evidence available for certain periods, strong conclusions may have to remain somewhat elusive, but the gathering of this evidence will surely prove useful in suggesting certain avenues of future investigation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×