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Chapter 8 - Sleep-related movement disorders

from Section IV - Primary Sleep Disorders in Psychiatric Contexts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2011

John W. Winkelman
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
David T. Plante
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
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Summary

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) are prevalent disorders in the general population. RLS is a clinical diagnosis and is based on the patient's description. Diagnostic criteria and clinical characteristics of the disorder were outlined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group in 1995. RLS is often considered to be a disease of middle to older age. However, the onset of RLS symptoms during childhood is commonly reported retrospectively by adult patients. Patients with sporadic or only mild RLS symptoms without significant impairment in daily life do not need pharmacological treatment. RLS symptoms do not lead to life-threatening complications but they usually persist chronically and therefore impair the patient's quality of life to a large extent. Other simple sleep-related movement disorders include hypnagogic foot tremor (HFT) and alternating leg muscle activation (ALMA).
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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