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5 - Transitioning to Electric Vehicles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2021

Henry Lee
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Daniel P. Schrag
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Matthew Bunn
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Michael Davidson
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Wei Peng
Affiliation:
Penn State University
Wang Pu
Affiliation:
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing
Mao Zhimin
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
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Summary

In 2018, China had 242 million motor vehicles on the road, with this number due to increase dramatically over the next decade. Its high-speed rail system stretched across most of the country and its airline industry has expanded. If China is going to have the capacity to decarbonize its energy mix, however, it will have to transition its vehicle fleet from one that is dependent on fossil-fuels to one that relies on electricity. In response to public concerns over high pollution levels and energy security, China hopes to have 80 million electric vehicles on the road by 2030. To meet this goal, China will have to accelerate its reform of its electricity system, build an effective electric charging infrastructure, and develop better and less costly battery technologies.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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