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5 - Divine Commands in the Imperative Mood

from Part II - The Construction of Norms in Islamic Jurisprudence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2019

Omar Farahat
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Summary

The fifth chapter focuses on the semantic aspects of the normative implications of divine revelation by studying the treatment of the imperative mood in uṣūl al-fiqh. I argue that the emergence of uṣūl al-fiqh as a primary mode of deliberation over the normative implications of revelation signified the general triumph of the Ashʿarī revelation-centric position, but that, at the level of detailed uṣūl al-fiqh dialectics, Muʿtazilī naturalism survived, and even dominated. While the engagement in uṣūl al-fiqh by all schools of thought meant that revelation had to be relied upon to achieve a form of universalizability, the dialectical nature of the discipline ensured that the universality of norms was the product of collective social construction.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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