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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2023

Jennifer A. Lorden
Affiliation:
College of William and Mary, Virginia
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Chapter
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Forms of Devotion in Early English Poetry
The Poetics of Feeling
, pp. 203 - 221
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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