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Section 5 - Therapeutic Approaches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2017

Susan Bailey
Affiliation:
Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AOMRC), London
Paul Tarbuck
Affiliation:
University of Central Lancashire, Preston
Prathiba Chitsabesan
Affiliation:
Stepping Hill Hospital, Stockport
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Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health
Meeting the Needs of Young Offenders
, pp. 239 - 288
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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