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Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2013

Catherine Esnouf
Affiliation:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Paris
Marie Russel
Affiliation:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Paris
Nicolas Bricas
Affiliation:
Centre de Co-opération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Paris
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Summary

Because of the approaches adopted according to their links to and potential impacts on food sustainability, the discussions that took place in the context of duALIne were designed to compile an inventory of the principal determinants governing past trends in food systems, to identify the critical points in these systems with respect to environmental, social, health and economic issues, and finally to highlight research questions that could be addressed by programmes in the future. This conclusion presents the main findings of this analysis, a summary of the research themes determined, subjects that still need to be explored and the prospects offered.

Western-style food systems are not sustainable

It is clear from the scientific literature that Western-style food systems, and of course their global extension, are not sustainable in terms of their consumption of resources, impacts on ecosystems and effects on health (overweight, obesity and associated pathologies). The central question is thus to determine which trends, which transitions or even which ruptures could lead to the emergence of more sustainable systems (integrating both the supply of products and the demands of food consumers).

Type
Chapter
Information
Food System Sustainability
Insights From duALIne
, pp. 233 - 246
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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