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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2019

Todd Timberlake
Affiliation:
Berry College, Georgia
Paul Wallace
Affiliation:
Agnes Scott College, Georgia
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Finding our Place in the Solar System
The Scientific Story of the Copernican Revolution
, pp. 355 - 364
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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