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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 December 2020

Jo Braithwaite
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
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Summary

This book evaluates thirty years of cases arising from the global derivatives markets. This period starts with the landmark House of Lords’ decision in Hazell v. Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council, takes us through the surge of litigation triggered by the 2008 global financial crisis and up to the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union. The book details how these cases have evolved in line with the markets themselves, growing more complex, more international and more technically challenging over time, but it also identifies remarkably consistent legal themes. Most importantly, it finds that the process of resolving disputes between participants in the derivatives markets across this period has, after a notorious start, been a source of robust rules for this systemically significant sector of the global financial markets and has helped to shape commercial law more broadly. This study also finds, however, that are important and ongoing challenges associated with this recent manifestation of ‘international business justice’.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Financial Courts
Adjudicating Disputes in Derivatives Markets
, pp. 1 - 13
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • Introduction
  • Jo Braithwaite, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: The Financial Courts
  • Online publication: 19 December 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108647434.002
Available formats
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Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • Jo Braithwaite, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: The Financial Courts
  • Online publication: 19 December 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108647434.002
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Jo Braithwaite, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: The Financial Courts
  • Online publication: 19 December 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108647434.002
Available formats
×