Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-4p99k Total loading time: 0.512 Render date: 2022-12-08T10:33:05.219Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

4 - Free Soil, Free Produce, Free Communities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Genevieve LeBaron
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield
Jessica R. Pliley
Affiliation:
Texas State University, San Marcos
David W. Blight
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Get access

Summary

This chapter explores the centrality of community organizing to past anti-slavery movements and examines the continuing role for community-based activism, with a focus on the United States and the United Kingdom. The contribution of community mobilization to contemporary antislavery action is often overlooked, with emphasis falling instead on the efforts of legislators, policy-makers, and NGOs. In arguing for a broader perspective we identify the historic role of three "convening" forces - faith, commerce, and place – in drawing individuals together. We argue that such forces played a core role in stimulating changes to existing social and cultural norms and underpinning a developing consensus on the human right to be free from slavery. We assert that such processes of "moral redefinition" start with individuals but are sustained and given momentum by groups – leading by example, suggesting and sharing, working together to express moral choices through considered action. We also find that faith, commerce, and place continue to offer significant convening role for antislavery organizing. The challenge facing community organizers in the present anti-slavery movement is clarifying and naming the diverse social and cultural norms underpinning contemporary forms of exploitation, as well as creating consensus on the best path for decisive action.

Type
Chapter
Information
Fighting Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking
History and Contemporary Policy
, pp. 73 - 96
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×