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1 - Human-nonhuman primate interactions: an ethnoprimatological approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Lisa Jones-Engel
Affiliation:
University of Washington National Primate Research Center
Michael A. Schillact
Affiliation:
University of Toronto at Scarborough
Gregory A. Engel
Affiliation:
University of Washington National Primate Research Center
Joanna M. Setchell
Affiliation:
University of Surrey, Roehampton
Deborah J. Curtis
Affiliation:
University of Surrey, Roehampton
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Summary

INTRODUCTION

Over the past decades, economic, political and social forces in the developing world have brought about deforestation on a massive scale, depleting the remaining natural habitats of wild nonhuman primates (NHPs). Squeezed into ever smaller domains surrounded by human society, NHPs are coming into increasingly regular contact with humans. Poaching and habitat destruction are recognised dangers to NHP populations in the wild. In contrast, the potentially devastating threat posed by human-to-NHP disease transmission in wild NHP populations is under-appreciated and not well studied (see also Chapter 8). We believe that effective programmes for the conservation of wild NHP populations must acknowledge the interrelation of habitat destruction, bushmeat hunting and human-to-NHP disease transmission.

Pathogens endemic to humans have the capacity to devastate NHP populations. This phenomenon has been observed repeatedly in laboratory settings, where epidemics of endemic human diseases such as influenza, tuberculosis, chicken pox and measles can cause mortality rates greater than 90% among NHPs, including animals newly captured from the wild (Padovan & Cantrell, 1986; Mansfield & King, 1998). If endemic human pathogens can cause such profound destruction among captive NHPs, it follows that we should explore the threat that human contact poses to wild NHPs.

Type
Chapter
Information
Field and Laboratory Methods in Primatology
A Practical Guide
, pp. 15 - 24
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

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References

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Engel, G. A., Jones-Engel, L., Schillaci, M. A., Suaryana, K. G., Putra, A., Fuentes, A. & Henkel, R. (2002). Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia. Emerg. Infect. Dis 8 [online] URL www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol8no8/01-0467.htmCrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fuentes, A. & Wolfe, L. D. (2002). Primates: Face to Face. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Jones-Engel, L., Engel, G. A., Schillaci, M. A., Babo, R. & Froehlich, J. (2001). Detection of antibodies to selected human pathogens among wild and pet macaques (Macaca tonkeana) in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Am. J. Primatol. 54, 171–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Padovan, D. & Cantrell, C. A. (1986). Varicella-like herpesvirus infections of nonhuman primates. Lab. Animal. Sci. 36, 7–13Google ScholarPubMed
Schillaci, M. A., Jones-Engel, L., Heidrich, J. E., Miller, G. P. & Froehlich, J. W. (2001). A field methodology for lateral cranial radiography of nonhuman primates. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 116, 278–84CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wallis, J. & Lee, D. R. (1999). Primate conservation: the prevention of disease transmission. Int. J. Primatol. 20, 803–26CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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