Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-mw9w7 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-13T10:18:31.390Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 3 - Extension’s Role in Promoting Resilience among Rural Families with Low Incomes

from Part I - Overview of Extension and the Social Sciences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2024

Maria Rosario T. de Guzman
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Holly Hatton
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Get access

Summary

Rural communities. Rural families. Both face challenges and opportunities for viability and security. The Rural Families Speak Project has been studying rural families with low incomes for over twenty years, listening to the voices of families and sharing their stories of challenges as well as resiliency with policymakers and community educators. Select findings of this rich body of work focused on four domains – food insecurity, economic security, health, and family well-being – and are shared in this chapter along with implications and recommendations for community outreach and education. In particular, the roles that Extension can play in serving rural communities and families are presented. This chapter illustrates the translational linkage between research and Extension work highlighting the importance of integrating research and practice.

Type
Chapter
Information
Extension Education and the Social Sciences
Uplifting Children, Youth, Families, and Communities
, pp. 40 - 63
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2024

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, K., & Swanson, J. (2002). Rural families: Welfare reform and food stamps. Policy Brief. Retrieved from www.cehd.umn.edu/FSoS/projects/ruralspeak/pdf/rural-families-brief2.pdfGoogle Scholar
Bao, J., & Greder, K. (2015). Effects of food insecurity and expectation of family involvement on rural Latina immigrant mothers’ mental health. Poster presentation at Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://iastate.box.com/s/ouwq9y7hcz9j2vjl7o53jp3nz35oai4bGoogle Scholar
Barnett, M. A., Yancura, L., Wilmoth, J. D., & Sano, Y. (2016). Well-being among rural grandfamilies in two multigenerational household structures. GrandFamilies: The Contemporary Journal of Research, Practice and Policy, 3. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.wmich.edu/grandfamilies/vol3/iss1/4Google Scholar
Bauer, J. W., & Braun, B. (2002). Rural families and welfare issues. Rural Families Speak Research Project.Google Scholar
Bauer, J. W., Braun, B., & Dyk, P. H. (2003). Health and the economic well-being of rural families. A public policy fact sheet. National Council on Family Relations.Google Scholar
Bauer, J. W., & Dolan, E. M. (2011). Rural families and work overview. In Bauer, J. W. & Dolan, E. M. (Eds.), In rural families and work (pp. 115). Springer.Google Scholar
Berry, A. A., Katras, M. J., Sano, Y., Lee, J., & Bauer, J. W. (2008). Job volatility of rural, low-income mothers: A mixed-methods approach. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 29(1), 522. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10834-007-9096-1Google Scholar
Braun, B., & Rudd, M. (2003). About mental health: Maryland rural families speak. Issue Brief. Retrieved from https://sph.umd.edu/sites/default/files/files/MentalHealthResearchBrief.pdfGoogle Scholar
Browder, D., Greder, K., & Jasper Crase, S. (2013). Individual and family factors related to depression among rural Latina immigrant mothers. Julian Samora Research Institute, Michigan State University.Google Scholar
Burney, J., Routh, B., Greder, K., & Greer, B. (2015). Associations between maternal depression and family nutrition and physical activity behaviors. Rural Families Speak about Health. Retrieved from https://iastate.box.com/s/e39g12cdgdq3rjzf4pusuea7ncujnvsxGoogle Scholar
Byrne, M., & Greder, K. (2014). Health insurance access and participation among Latinos in Iowa. Policy Brief. Iowa State University.Google Scholar
Corson, C. M. (2001). Health, well-being, and financial self-sufficiency of low-income families in the context of welfare reform. [Unpublished master’s thesis]. Oregon State University.Google Scholar
Cromartie, J., & Vilorio, D. (2019). Rural population trends. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Retrieved from www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2019/february/rural-population-trends/Google Scholar
Downey, J., & Greder, K. (2014). Depressive symptomology among rural low-income Latina and non-Latina white mothers. In Blair, S. L. and McCormick, J. H. (Eds.), Family and health: Evolving needs, responsibilities, and experiences (pp. 247269). Emerald Group.Google Scholar
Dyk, P. D., Radunovich, H., & Sano, Y. (2018). Health challenges faced by rural, low-income families: Insights into health disparities. Family Science Review, 22(1), 5469. https://doi.org/10.26536/FSR.2018.22.02.04Google Scholar
Economic Research Service. (2017). Rural America at a glance, 2017 edition. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved from www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/85740/eib-182.pdf?v=9533.8Google Scholar
Food and Nutrition Service. United States Department of Agriculture. (2020). FY 2021 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Guidance. https://snaped.fns.usda.gov/program-administration/guidance-and-templatesGoogle Scholar
Greder, K., Cancel-Tirado, D. I., Rough, B., & Bao, J. (2020). Engaging with rural Latinx families. The Forum for Family and Consumer Issues, 23(1). www.theforumjournal.org/2021/03/01/engaging-with-rural-latinx-families/Google Scholar
Greder, K., Cook, C., Garasky, S., & Ortiz, L. (2008). Latino immigrants in Iowa and the United States: Food and housing insecurity. Policy Brief. Iowa State University.Google Scholar
Greder, K., & Sano, Y. (2011). Health-seeking behavior in families. In Craft-Rosenberg, M. J. & Pehler, S. R. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of family health. S. R. Sage.Google Scholar
Greder, K., Slowing, F. R., & Doudna, K. (2012). Latina immigrant mothers: Negotiating new food environments to preserve cultural food practices and healthy child eating. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, 41(2), 145160. https://doi.org/10.1111/fcsr.12004Google Scholar
Grutzmacher, S., & Braun, B. (2004). Food resource management: Key to food security outcomes among rural, low-income families. Research brief. Family Policy Impact Seminar. University of Maryland.Google Scholar
Gudmunson, C. G., Son, S., Lee, J., & Bauer, J. W. (2010). EITC participation and association with financial distress among rural low-income families. Family Relations, 59(4), 369382. https://doi.org/10.2307/40864558Google Scholar
Guyer, A. (2003). Depression risk: An examination of rural low-income mothers. [Unpublished master’s thesis]. Oregon State University.Google Scholar
Haynes-Maslow, L., Osborne, I., & Pitts, S. J. (2019). Examining barriers and facilitators to delivering SNAP-Ed direct nutrition education in rural communities. American Journal of Health Promotion, 33(5), 736744. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890117118821845Google Scholar
Katras, M. J., Zuiker, V. S., & Bauer, J. W. (2004). Private safety net: Childcare resources from the perspective of rural low-income families. Family Relations, 53, 201209. https://10.1111/j.0022-2445.2004.00010.xGoogle Scholar
Mammen, S., Berry, A. A., Bird, C., & Chandler, K. D. (2018). Rural low-income families’ quest for economic security: It takes more than a paycheck. Family Sciences Review, 22(1), 925. https://doi.org/10.26536/FSR.2018.22.01.01Google Scholar
Mammen, S., & Lawrence, F. (2006). Use of the earned income tax credit by rural working families. Proceedings of the 33rd Conference of the Eastern Family Economics Resource Management Association, 29–37.Google Scholar
Mammen, S., & Sano, Y. (2012). Gaining access to economically marginalized rural populations: Lessons learned from non-probability sampling. Rural Sociology, 77(3), 462482. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1549-0831.2012.00083.xGoogle Scholar
Mammen, S., & Sano, Y. (2013). Basebook Report. Rural Families Speak about Health (RFSH) (2008–2014). Technical report prepared for the Rural Families Speak about Health project team.Google Scholar
Mammen, S., Sano, Y., Braun, B., & Maring, E. F. (2019). Shaping core health messages: Rural, low-income mothers speak through participatory action research. Health Communication, 32(10), 11411149. https://10.1080/10410236.2018.1465792Google Scholar
Masten, A. S. (2018). Resilience theory and research on children and families: Past, present, and promise. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 10, 1231. https://doi.org/10.1111/jftr.12255Google Scholar
Meit, M. (2018). Exploring strategies to improve health and equity in rural communities. The Walsh Center for Rural Health Analysis. NORC at the University of Chicago.Google Scholar
National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (2017). Nutrition education: A path forward for EFNEP. United States Department of Agriculture. https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resource/EFNEP-point-of-departure-03.13.2017-FINAL.pdfGoogle Scholar
National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (2021a). 2020 impacts: The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved from https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/resource/2020%20EFNEP%20National%20Data%20Reports.pdfGoogle Scholar
National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (2021b). About EFNEP. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved from https://nifa.usda.gov/program/about-efnepGoogle Scholar
Noonan, D., Dardas, L., Bice-Wigington, T., Huddleston-Casas, C. A., Sloan, R., Benjamin, R., Choi, S. & Simmons, L. A. (2016). Understanding multiple behavioral risk factors for cancer in rural women. Public Health Nursing, 33(6), 519528. https://doi.org/10.1111/phn.12282Google Scholar
Ontai, L. L., Barnett, M. A., Smith, S., Wilmoth, J. D., & Yancura, L. (2018). Understanding family well-being in the context of rural poverty: Lessons from the Rural Families Speak Project. Family Science Review, 22(1), 3953. https://doi.org/10.26536/FSR.2018.22.01.03Google Scholar
Routh, B., Burney, J., Greder, K., Katras, M. J., & Johnson, K. (2020). Rural health disparities: Connecting research and practice. The Forum for Family and Consumer Issues, 23(1). www.theforumjournal.org/2021/03/01/rural-health-disparities-connecting-research-and-practice/Google Scholar
Sano, Y., Garasky, S., Greder, K. A., Cook, C. C., & Browder, D. E. (2011). Understanding food insecurity among Latino immigrant families in rural America. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 32(1), 111123. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10834-010-9219-yGoogle Scholar
Sano, Y., Mammen, S., & Oliver, B. (2018). Food insecurity among rural, low-income families. Family Science Review, 22(1), 2638. https://doi.org/10.26536/FSR.2018.22.02.02Google Scholar
Sano, Y., Manoogian, M. M., & Ontai, L. L. (2012). “The Kids Still Come First”: Creating family stability during partnership instability in rural, low-income families. Journal of Family Issues, 33, 942965. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X11430820Google Scholar
Sano, Y., Richards, L. N., & Lee, J. (2011). Invisible barriers to employment: Mental and behavioral health problems that hinder self-sufficiency. In Bauer, J. W. & Dolan, E. M. (Eds.), Rural mothers and work: Contexts and problems (pp. 7798). Springer.Google Scholar
Sano, Y., Routh, B., & Lanigan, J. (2019). Food parenting practices in rural poverty context. Appetite, 135(1), 115122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2018.11.024Google Scholar
Simmons, L. A., Huddleston-Casas, C., & Berry, A. A. (2007). Low-income rural women and depression: Factors associated with self-reporting. American Journal of Health Behavior, 31(6), 657666. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.31.6.10Google Scholar
Sneed, C. T., Franck, K. L., Norman, H., Washburn, L., Kennedy, L., Jarvandi, S., & Mullins, J. (2020). Two states, one mission: Building PSE capacity of county Extension educators. Journal of Extension, 58(4). https://joe.org/joe/2020august/iw1.phpGoogle Scholar
Swanson, J. A., Olson, C. M., Miller, E. O., & Lawrence, F. C. (2008). Rural mothers’ use of formal programs and informal social supports to meet family food needs: A mixed methods study. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 29(4), 674690. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10834-008-9127-6Google Scholar
Tabatabaei-Moghaddam, H., Sano, Y., & Mammen, S. (2014). A case study in creating oral health messages for rural low-income families: A comparison to the Cultural Appropriateness (CA) framework. Health Promotion and Practice, 15(5), 646653. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524839914533567Google Scholar
Washburn, L. T., Norman, H., Franck, K. L., Kennedy, L. E., & Sneed, C. T. (2021). Integrating PSE work into FCS Extension programming: Lessons learned from a multi-state training. Journal of Human Sciences and Extension, 9(1). www.jhseonline.com/article/view/1031Google Scholar
Winterbauer, N. L., Bekemeier, B., VanRaemdonck, L., & Hoover, A. G. (2016). Applying community-based participatory research partnership principles to public health practice-based research networks. SAGE Open, 6(4). https://doi.org/10.1177/2158244016679211 Top of FormBottom of FormGoogle Scholar
Yancura, L. A., Piper, J. L., Wallace, H. S., & Berry, A. A. (2020). How does research inform work with multigenerational and skipped-generation households in rural America?. The Forum for Family and Consumer Issues, 23(1), 115.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×