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22 - The Experimental Turn in Public Management: How Methodological Preferences Drive Substantive Choices

from Part IV - Issues and Implications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2017

Oliver James
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
Sebastian R. Jilke
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, New Jersey
Gregg G. Van Ryzin
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, New Jersey
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Experiments in Public Management Research
Challenges and Contributions
, pp. 461 - 475
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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