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Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Todd Klutz
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
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Summary

In order to derive maximum insight from the method described in chapter 1, each of the analyses above has approached its particular story in a deliberately schematising fashion, breaking the text down into several different levels of style (e.g., transitivity and intertextuality) and context (e.g., co-text and culture). In chapter 4, however, my treatments of co-text, implied situation, and context of culture began to pull together the main discoveries from the various levels of analysis and lay out the contours of an interpretative synthesis. My aim here is to finish what I began to do there.

In the interest of producing a synthesis, the relationship between my genre-critical inquiry into the Acts 16 narrative's silence about the fate of the slave-girl and my prior sketch of the four stories' implied situation has special importance. More specifically, by demonstrating how that particular instance of silence helps to foreground an image of Paul as an ideal Jew who embodies the antithesis of paganism and nobly endures the Judeophobic machinations of greedy charlatans and gullible magistrates, my cultural analysis of Acts 16.16–18 and its immediate co-text confirms a central thesis in my prior reconstruction of the exorcism stories' context of situation: namely, as the implied audience of these episodes needed reassurance that both Paul and the Jesus he preached were loyal to Jewish ancestral custom and legitimate heirs to the heritage of Israel, that audience itself must have been either partly Jewish, or partly composed of the sorts of Gentiles represented by Lydia in Acts 16 (i.e., those who to one degree or another had sympathised with Judaism before joining the Christ cult), or constituted chiefly by a combination of those two socioreligious types.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts
A Sociostylistic Reading
, pp. 265 - 269
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

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  • Conclusion
  • Todd Klutz, University of Manchester
  • Book: The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511488030.006
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  • Conclusion
  • Todd Klutz, University of Manchester
  • Book: The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511488030.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Todd Klutz, University of Manchester
  • Book: The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511488030.006
Available formats
×