Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.192 Render date: 2021-11-27T09:37:03.706Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

12 - The solar system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2011

Michael Perryman
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
Get access

Summary

Theories of exoplanet formation and migration can be confronted with a wealth of diverse observational constraints from the solar system, of which this chapter provides an incomplete and selective summary.

Amongst them are the orbital motions of the planets (including spacings, eccentricities and inclinations, dynamical stability and resonances), planetary masses and rotation (and their angular momentum distribution), the existence of planetary satellites and rings, the occurrence of other minor bodies (comets, asteroids and meteorites, including the presence of the Oort Cloud and the Edgeworth–Kuiper belt), bulk and isotopic compositions, radiogenic isotope ages, and cratering records.

The publications listed in Table 12.1 provide more detailed perspectives, with a recent synthesis given by de Pater & Lissauer (2010). Early theories of the formation of the solar system are summarised in §10.4.1.

Birth in clusters

Most stars are born in molecular clouds as members of stellar clusters although, rarely, some stars might be born in isolation (Lada & Lada, 2003). Whether the Sun was formed in isolation or in a cluster remains uncertain (Adams, 2010). Evidence for the latter includes the dynamical structure of the Edgeworth–Kuiper belt which suggests a nearby encounter with another star (Morbidelli & Levison, 2004), and short-lived radionuclides and their decay products in the proto-solar nebula (Hester et al., 2004; Hester & Desch, 2005; Gounelle & Meibom, 2008), explicable in terms of a supernova explosion within 1–2 pc of the young Sun (Looney et al., 2006).

Type
Chapter
Information
The Exoplanet Handbook , pp. 293 - 308
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • The solar system
  • Michael Perryman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
  • Book: The Exoplanet Handbook
  • Online publication: 01 June 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511994852.013
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • The solar system
  • Michael Perryman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
  • Book: The Exoplanet Handbook
  • Online publication: 01 June 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511994852.013
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • The solar system
  • Michael Perryman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
  • Book: The Exoplanet Handbook
  • Online publication: 01 June 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511994852.013
Available formats
×