Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-hvdfp Total loading time: 0.368 Render date: 2022-01-20T10:49:39.938Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

8 - Host stars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2011

Michael Perryman
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
Get access

Summary

Properties of the host stars of exoplanets are derived from a combination of astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic observations, interpreted primarily within the context of stellar evolutionary models.

Planets are now known to exist around a wide variety of stellar types: not only around main sequence stars like the Sun, but around M dwarfs (§2.4.4) and as lower mass companions to brown dwarfs (§7.5), around pulsating stars including hot subdwarfs (§4.2.2) and δ Scu variables (WASP–33), around giants (§2.4.5), and around objects in the terminal stages of evolution including pulsars (§4.1) and probably white dwarfs (§4.2.1). They are found in binary systems (§4.3), around stars of the thick disk (e.g. WASP–21), around stars of low-metallicity both from radial velocity surveys (§2.4.6) and from transit surveys (e.g. WASP–37), in open clusters (§2.4.6), and perhaps in the bulge (MOA–2008–BLG–310).

Knowledge from astrometry

Hipparcos distances and proper motions

The majority of stars monitored for radial velocity or photometric transit observations are bright and consequently relatively nearby (d < 50 – 70 pc). Distances and proper motions are therefore generally well determined from the Hipparcos satellite measurements. Operated between 1989–93, Hipparcos provided 1 mas accuracy in positions, parallaxes and annual proper motions for about 120,000 stars (Perryman, 1997; Perryman et al., 1997), subsequently improved through an enhanced satellite attitude solution (van Leeuwen, 2007). These precise distances (Figure 8.1) translate into improved determination of the host star properties.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Exoplanet Handbook , pp. 181 - 208
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Host stars
  • Michael Perryman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
  • Book: The Exoplanet Handbook
  • Online publication: 01 June 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511994852.009
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Host stars
  • Michael Perryman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
  • Book: The Exoplanet Handbook
  • Online publication: 01 June 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511994852.009
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Host stars
  • Michael Perryman, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg
  • Book: The Exoplanet Handbook
  • Online publication: 01 June 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511994852.009
Available formats
×