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Chapter 8 - Exploring development and evolution on the tangled bank

from Part III - The structure of evolutionary theory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2014

R. Paul Thompson
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Denis Walsh
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
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Summary

The Evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) is shaped by the society of biologists. This chapter views at the backgrounds and origins of the evo-devo, at what is at issue today, and at some trends for the future in biology and for philosophy of science amidst the entangled studies of development and evolution. Charles Darwin provided the first connections of embryology and evolution when he pointed to embryological facts and asserted that embryos provide the strongest support for his ideas of evolution. The chapter focuses on just one story that is well documented. This official stage in the emergence of evo-devo occurred at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Within evo-devo these concepts -modularity, evolvability, constraints, homology, plasticity, and, more recently, epigenetic and environmental factors contribute to the theoretical description of the phenomenology of phenotypic evolution.
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Chapter
Information
Evolutionary Biology
Conceptual, Ethical, and Religious Issues
, pp. 151 - 172
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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