Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-d2wc8 Total loading time: 0.367 Render date: 2021-10-18T11:56:27.204Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

13 - Fig–associated wasps: pollinators and parasites, sex–ratio adjustment and male polymorphism, population structure and its consequences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2010

Jae C. Choe
Affiliation:
Seoul National University
Bernard J. Crespi
Affiliation:
Simon Fraser University, British Columbia
Get access

Summary

ABSTRACT

Fig–pollinating and fig–parasitizing wasps are integral parts of one of the most fascinating plant–insect interactions known. Moreover, studies of these wasps have been instrumental in developing and refining ideas concerning the influence of population structure and inbreeding on shaping the outcome of kin selection. We present data compiled from six studies spanning five continents that relate brood sex ratios with foundress number in 24 pollinator species. All predictions of local mate competition (LMC) and inbreeding theory are at least qualitatively supported. Additionally, the sex ratios produced by single foundresses of any given species appear to be influenced by brood size and the frequency of multiple foundress broods in that species. We then consider the assumptions underlying the testing of the specific LMC model and consider the relative merits of observational and experimental tests of the theory. Furthermore, we discuss the existing studies of the parasitic wasp species that have addressed the unusual morphological and behavioral polymorphisms for flightlessness and lethal combat that are found in the males of these species. These differences appear to be influenced by the parasites' population structure and density, although other factors are also implicated. Finally, we compare the nature of the support for LMC theory from fig–pollinating wasps with that from the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis, and suggest future lines of research.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
52
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×