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Chapter 5 - Reliability and Measurement Error

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 May 2020

Thomas B. Newman
Affiliation:
University of California, San Francisco
Michael A. Kohn
Affiliation:
University of California, San Francisco
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Summary

A test should give the same or similar results when administered repeatedly to the same individual within a time too short for real biological variation to take place. Results should be consistent whether the test is repeated by the same observer or instrument or by different observers or instruments. This desirable characteristic of a test is called “reliability” or “reproducibility.”

Type
Chapter
Information
Evidence-Based Diagnosis
An Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology
, pp. 110 - 143
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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