Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4k54s Total loading time: 0.169 Render date: 2021-12-08T14:14:11.977Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

6 - Glimpsing Beethoven’s Truth Content Through Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2021

Get access

Summary

SHORTLY BEFORE THE RECAPITULATION in the first movement of Beethoven's Violin Sonata in A major, op. 47, the so-called ‘Kreutzer’ Sonata, the pianist plays a pp chord of G– (see Example 6.1).

This chord (bb. 324–5) barely merits a mention in two recent analyses of the movement, one that appears in a broader study of musical ‘becoming’ by Janet Schmalfeldt (Schmalfeldt 2011, chapter 4) and one by David Damschroder which is written in conscious dialogue with hers (Damschroder 2016, chapter 10). Both are worth examining in detail. Although she explains what it leads to, Schmalfeldt says nothing about the pp G– chord itself:

Beethoven … [gives] the violinist a sequential repetition of the pianist's cadenza, here prolonging the dominant of the subdominant (iv) – that is, the dominant of the very harmony with which the exposition eccentrically began. The violinist's sequence in turn motivates a full-fledged statement (at mm. 326–35) of the main theme's first phrase, but now in D minor; this is of course the ‘wrong’ key for a conventional recapitulation, but the right key, the subdominant, for a false recapitulation in this movement. A great advantage of this maneuver is that it lands the phrase on an F-major chord at m. 334 – one more opportunity to reinforce the role of F♮ as a pivotal tone in this movement. The semitone with which the false recapitulation began – A–B♭ – then serves (at mm. 336–40) as the impetus for the move toward the true home-key recapitulation; but note that the chord on F (at mm. 340–43) plays the penultimate role in this modulation (Schmalfeldt 2011, 103).

Schmalfeldt is so keen to describe the gesture which establishes a false recapitulation, and its conversion to a true recapitulation, that she fails to mention the G– chord which is strangely interposed between the dominant she highlights and the tonic that it indicates. Her point is well made that D– is the ‘right key … for a false recapitulation in this movement’, because the exposition's P theme starts on that chord, which (as she has already noted earlier in her analysis) is prepared at length in the preceding slow introduction.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×