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4 - Privacy, Confidentiality, and Public Health Reporting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2015

Catherine Marco
Affiliation:
Wright State University, Ohio
Raquel Schears
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Emergency Medicine, Minnesota
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

ACEP Board of Directors. (n.d.). Code of ethics for emergency physicians. American College of Emergency Physicians policy statements on ethical issues. www.acep.org/Clinical-Practice-Management/Code-of-Ethics-for-Emergency-Physicians/
ACEP Board of Directors. (2007a). Domestic family violence. American College of Emergency Physicians policy statements on ethical issues. www.emergencycareforyou.org/Health-Tips/Prevention/Domestic-Violence; also see, www.acep.org/Clinical-Practice-Management/List-of-Key-Elements-of-Family-Violence-Protocols
ACEP Board of Directors. (2007b). Emergency department planning and resource guidelines. American College of Emergency Physicians policy statement. www.acep.org/Clinical-practice-management/from-hippocrates-to-hipaa--privacy-and-confidentiality-in-emergency-medicinedpart-ii--challenges-in-the-emergency-department
ACEP Board of Directors. (2009). Filming in the emergency department. American College of Emergency Physicians policy statements on ethical issues. www.acep.org/Clinical---Practice-Management/Filming-in-the-Emergency-Department
ACEP Board of Directors. (2011). Recording devices in the emergency department. American College of Emergency Physicians policy statements on ethical issues. www.acep.org/Clinical---Practice-Management/Recording-Devices-in-the-Emergency-Department
Allen, A. L. (1995). Privacy in healthcare. In Warren, E. & Reich, T. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of bioethics (vol. 4, pp. 20642073). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Barlas, D., Sama, A. E., Ward, M. F., & Lesser, M. L. Comparison of the auditory and visual privacy of emergency department treatment areas with curtains versus those with solid walls. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 38(2), 135139.CrossRef
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (n.d.). National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). NNDSS notifiable condition list. wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/script/conditionlist.aspx?type=0&yr=2014
Geiderman, J. M., Moskop, J. C., & Derse, A. R. (2006). Privacy and confidentiality in emergency medicine: Obligations and challenges. Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, 24(3), 633656.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mlinek, E. J., & Pierce, J. (1997). Confidentiality and privacy breaches in a university hospital emergency department. Academic Emergency Medicine, 4(12), 11421146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olsen, J. C., Cutcliffe, B., & O’Brien, B. C. (2008). Emergency department design and patient perceptions of privacy and confidentiality. Journal of Emergency Medicine, 35(3), 317320.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Purdy, S., Plasso, A., Finkelstein, J., Fletcher, R., Christiansen, C., & Inui, T. (2000). Enrollees’ perceptions of participating in the education of medical students at an academically affiliated HMO. Academic Medicine, 75(10), 10031009.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Summary of the HIPAA Privacy Rule. www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/summary/
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2003). Security standards – final rule. The HIPAA Security Rule. Federal Register, February 20. www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/securityrulepdf.pdf
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights. (2005). Hurricane Katrina bulletin: HIPAA privacy and disclosures in emergency situations. www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/special/emergency/katrinanhipaa.pdf
Zimmermann, K. A. (2012). Hurricane Katrina: Facts, damage & aftermath. LiveScience. TechMedia Network, 20 August. www.livescience.com/22522-hurricane-katrina-facts.html

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