Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-ndmmz Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-28T15:13:56.871Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

18 - Xenopus as a Model to Study Endothelial Development and Modulation

from PART I - CONTEXT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2010

Aldo Ciau-Uitz
Affiliation:
Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Claire Fernandez
Affiliation:
Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Roger Patient
Affiliation:
Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
William C. Aird
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Get access

Summary

The endothelial cells (ECs) of the primary vascular plexuses are among the first mesodermal derivatives to differentiate and become functional in the vertebrate embryo. Anatomically, ECs can be seen developing long before the heart initiates beating and, in gene expression studies, cells expressing endothelium-specific genes can be detected just after the end of gastrulation. In mammalian models, in embryo studies of the early events involved in the induction of ECs from their mesodermal precursors, a process termed vasculogenesis, are hampered by the technical difficulties inherent to the in utero development of the embryo. In addition, gene perturbations that result in impaired vasculogenesis are usually fatal and, as a consequence, the further remodeling and maturation of the vascular system, angiogenesis, cannot be investigated. Although embryonic stem cells and EC lines represent useful systems for the investigation of the signaling mechanisms involved during vasculogenesis and/or angiogenesis, due to their cell homogeneity and low anatomical complexity, these signaling mechanisms may well not be fully applicable to the embryo environment. Thus, model systems such as Xenopus and zebrafish, in which embryos develop externally and in a less circulation-dependent manner, offer an invaluable opportunity for the study of the early development of the vascular system. However, because the zebrafish is less amenable for transplantation and lineage-labeling experiments and, critically, because it lacks smooth muscle cells and a lymphatic system, Xenopus appears to be more suited for the study of some aspects of blood vessel development. Therefore, fate maps of the different blood vessels can be generated in Xenopus, and the importance of the interaction between ECs and smooth muscle cells during blood vessel formation can be studied.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×