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6 - Hagfish: A Model for Early Endothelium

from PART I - CONTEXT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2010

Pavan K. Cheruvu
Affiliation:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Daniel Gale
Affiliation:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Ann M. Dvorak
Affiliation:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
David Haig
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
William C. Aird
Affiliation:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Salisbury Cove, Maine
William C. Aird
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
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Summary

Evolution can be viewed as a gradual accumulation of adaptive mutations against a background of neutral change. Intraspecific diversity may be the substrate of evolution, but intraorganismal diversity – the emergence of new proteins, new cell types, and new tissue functionalities – is its exquisite product. Each organism, indeed each organ, is a complex, interlocking “bundle of adaptations.” The endothelium is no exception. Over the last three decades, the notion that the endothelium represents an uncomplicated permeability-selective barrier between blood and interstitium has been revised considerably. Endothelial cells (ECs) are now known to regulate inflammation, hemostasis, vasomotor tone, growth and proliferation of other cells, antigen presentation, extravasation of immune cells, and metabolism of tissue- or blood-derived hormones. These functions are differentially regulated in space and time (reviewed in 1). Endothelial cell heterogeneity reflects the capacity of the endothelium to adapt and respond to the unique demands of the underlying tissue (reviewed in 2). An important goal is to dissect the complex molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial cell function and dysfunction.

THE CALL FOR AN EVOLUTIONARY APPROACH

Why study comparative and evolutionary vascular biology? First, evolution is at heart an historical science, and curiosity drives us to understand the narrative of biological change as well as patterns that may underlie this change. Second, the study of simple models has for centuries been an indispensable tool for sharpening our analysis of more complex biological systems. One is reminded of the contributions of Mendel on Pisum sativum, Morgan on Drosophila melanogaster, and Kandel on Aplysia californica.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

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  • Hagfish: A Model for Early Endothelium
    • By Pavan K. Cheruvu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Daniel Gale, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Ann M. Dvorak, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, David Haig, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, William C. Aird, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Salisbury Cove, Maine
  • Edited by William C. Aird, Harvard University, Massachusetts
  • Book: Endothelial Biomedicine
  • Online publication: 04 May 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511546198.007
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  • Hagfish: A Model for Early Endothelium
    • By Pavan K. Cheruvu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Daniel Gale, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Ann M. Dvorak, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, David Haig, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, William C. Aird, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Salisbury Cove, Maine
  • Edited by William C. Aird, Harvard University, Massachusetts
  • Book: Endothelial Biomedicine
  • Online publication: 04 May 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511546198.007
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Hagfish: A Model for Early Endothelium
    • By Pavan K. Cheruvu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Daniel Gale, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Ann M. Dvorak, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, David Haig, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, William C. Aird, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Salisbury Cove, Maine
  • Edited by William C. Aird, Harvard University, Massachusetts
  • Book: Endothelial Biomedicine
  • Online publication: 04 May 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511546198.007
Available formats
×