Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-lmg95 Total loading time: 0.234 Render date: 2021-10-17T07:18:48.810Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

12 - The Dynamics of Emotion-Related Behaviors in Infancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2009

Marc D. Lewis
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Isabela Granic
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Get access

Summary

The maintenance, production, and transformation of stable organism-environment systems require an intricate organization of the organism's behavior. In man as in many other species, emotions are an essential part of the behavioral system. They play a crucial role as evaluative classifiers or categorizers of states and events, as signals to oneself or to conspecifics, all in the service of generalized appropriate action on the vagaries of an only partially predictable and manageable environment. Emotions are not just internal states. On the contrary, they should be viewed as internal reactions that an organism has learned to observe or detect within itself and within other organisms, in principle conspecifics and related species. Thus, the outward expression of emotions has important signal value. Especially in social species, where the maintenance of a successful organism-environment system depends on the regulation of action among members of a social group, emotional expressions are vital signals of the internal states of individuals.

A particular and biologically extremely important social bond is that between a young infant and its primary caregivers, simply because most neonates cannot survive without the care of their elders, and – in our own and related species – the care of the mother in particular.

Type
Chapter
Information
Emotion, Development, and Self-Organization
Dynamic Systems Approaches to Emotional Development
, pp. 324 - 348
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×