Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-s4m2s Total loading time: 0.255 Render date: 2021-10-17T20:29:19.756Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

3 - Ad Hoc and Mesh Network Protocols and Their Integration with the Internet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Suli Zhao
Affiliation:
Qualcomm
Shweta Jain
Affiliation:
City University of New York
Dipankar Raychaudhuri
Affiliation:
Rutgers University, New Jersey
Mario Gerla
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Get access

Summary

Abstract

Ad hoc and multihop wireless networks are becoming increasingly important for a variety of applications ranging from tactical military networks, to metro area WiFi networks, to sensor applications. Multihop wireless is motivated by the fact that many embedded wireless devices are power-limited and cannot communicate directly with a distant base station or access point. In addition, ad hoc network formation is motivated by mobile service scenarios, such as tactical or vehicular. Protocol design considerations are given for both mobile ad hoc network (MANET) and static (planned) mesh network scenarios. These include self-organization, resource discovery, medium access control, and routing. Existing routing protocols for MANETs, including Destination Sequenced Distance Vector (DSDV), Dynamic Source Routing (DSR), and Ad hoc On-demand Distance Vector (AODV), are described and performance comparisons are given. More recent work on cross-layer mesh-routing protocols is introduced, including cross-layer metrics such as Airtime or PHY/MAC Awate Routing Metric for Ad hoc networks (PARMA), as well as Integrated Routing and Medium Access (IRMA) control. The chapter concludes with implications for future IP protocols that would allow for seamless integration of multihop wired and wireless networks.

Introduction and Motivation

Wireless ad hoc and mesh networks have been an important research area for about two decades. Research topics like the network architecture and design, integration with TCP/IP, routing, and medium access control in the shared wireless medium have been discussed at length. However, the mobile and dynamic nature of the network introduces new challenges in self-organization, including neighbor and topology discovery, network management, and disconnected operation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×