Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-cjp7w Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-15T20:31:19.120Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

4 - Integrating Islamic Schools into the Indonesian National Education System: A Case of Architecture over Implementation?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2015

Robert Kingham
Affiliation:
Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), Philippines
Jemma Parsons
Affiliation:
Cardno Emerging Markets Jakarta
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

Indonesia's education system is the fourth largest in the world. Although data on the exact number of Islamic schools (madrasah) in the country differ, the Ministry of Religious Affairs claimed to manage about 45,000 in 2010. More than 90 per cent of these were private schools, many of them set up by local communities or major Islamic civil society foundations in the absence of state-sponsored alternatives. Although there are important exceptions, the majority of private madrasah have a lower income base, fewer resources and poorer facilities than the state-funded schools, and thus deliver a significantly lower standard of education. They are disproportionately represented in remote or disadvantaged areas and generally have higher proportions of poor students and girls than their state school equivalents. Private madrasah, funded primarily by their communities, deliver the mandatory nine years of basic education to around 6 million students: 3.5 million in 22,000 Islamic primary schools (madrasah ibtidayah) and 2.5 million in 14,000 Islamic junior secondary schools (madrasah tsanawiyah).

Two national ministries are responsible for education: the Ministry of Education and Culture, which has overall responsibility for the public schools; and the Ministry of Religious Affairs, which operates the faith-based schools. The two systems run parallel to each other; they both teach a core curriculum of general subjects, supplemented in the case of the Islamic schools by an additional 30 per cent or so of religious education subjects. This means in practice that few Islamic schools have the capacity to teach the full curriculum of general subjects, although some cope with the additional load by teaching religious subjects in afternoon sessions outside school hours.

The duration of schooling is the same for both the public and faith-based school systems; they offer six years of primary education, three years of junior secondary education and three years of senior secondary education. However, the graduation certificates issued by unaccredited madrasah are not recognized as a qualification for continuing education, and madrasah student participation in external national examinations is not automatic. To some extent, these deficiencies have been addressed by the establishment in 2007 of a national board (BAN-S/M) providing uniform standards of accreditation for all schools.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×