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8 - South Dublin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2023

Christopher Morash
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
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Summary

In many cities, it is often assumed that the residential suburbs are not the sort of place in which literary culture thrives.And, indeed, the work of one of the most prominent writers associated with the suburbs of south Dublin – Eavan Boland – has taken this idea as a major theme in her work.However, a closer analysis shows that south Dublin has long had rich literary associations, and it is this intersection of private and public that is the focus of this chapter. It was here that both James Joyce and G. B. Shaw were born, and where W. B. Yeats lived. The area was also a hive of activity during the Irish Literary Revival, whether in the school run by Patrick Pearse, or in the literary salons of George Russell (Æ). More recently, it has been associated with poets such as Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, as well as with Booker-winning novelist Anne Enright, whose novel Actress provides the chapter with a starting point. Far from being the quiet annex to the boisterous city-centre literary pubs, the south Dublin suburbs have been the site of intense literary activity of many kinds for the more than a century, a place where the intersections of public and private can be explored.

Type
Chapter
Information
Dublin
A Writer's City
, pp. 164 - 185
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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  • South Dublin
  • Christopher Morash, Trinity College Dublin
  • Book: Dublin
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108917810.009
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  • South Dublin
  • Christopher Morash, Trinity College Dublin
  • Book: Dublin
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108917810.009
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • South Dublin
  • Christopher Morash, Trinity College Dublin
  • Book: Dublin
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108917810.009
Available formats
×