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Introduction to Part V

from Part V - Disability, Intersectionality, and Social Movements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2020

I. Glenn Cohen
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Carmel Shachar
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Anita Silvers
Affiliation:
San Francisco State University
Michael Ashley Stein
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
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Summary

“What we owe to each other” is a question that consumed the philosopher T. M. Scanlon, and more recently has been the focus of the popular sitcom The Good Place. This question can be framed very broadly: how does each individual in society interact with everyone else? This question can also be the launching point for a narrower inquiry: in light of unique circumstances, what does society owe its members, such as disabled individuals? Even more specifically, how do we translate what is “owed” disabled individuals into a regulatory regime that can carry out these obligations? The question of what is owed is especially important when considering our legal system because, generally, to provide an individual with a right means to impose an obligation on another actor.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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