Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.326 Render date: 2021-10-23T00:03:20.457Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2018

Dev Nathan
Affiliation:
Institute for Human Development, New Delhi, India
Meenu Tewari
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Sandip Sarkar
Affiliation:
Institute for Human Development, New Delhi, India
Dev Nathan
Affiliation:
Institute for Human Development, New Delhi
Meenu Tewari
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Sandip Sarkar
Affiliation:
Institute for Human Development, New Delhi
Get access

Summary

This book is in many ways a follow-up to our earlier edited book (Nathan, Tewari and Sarkar, 2016). While that book dealt with labour conditions and labour issues in global value chains (GVCs) in Asia, this book deals with the manner in which upgrading and innovation have taken/can take place in GVCs; once again, with a focus on the Asian experience.

This ‘Introduction’ starts out by listing the various dimensions of a GVC; within this, emphasis is placed on the GVC as embodying a division, albeit a changing division, of knowledge and capabilities across geographies. After this, we define the ways in which firms may or may not strategically interact with GVCs. This is followed by listing the different types of upgrading, commonly discussed in the GVC literature. However, different types of upgrading enable the capture of rents, whether process or product rents, which are discussed in the next section. This passage through different types of rents itself depends on the manner in which knowledge is developed, both within and around value chains.

Thus, this introduction stresses upon a scheme where knowledge (which results in both process and product innovations and their corresponding rents) is crucial to development within and around value chains. There are many analyses of innovation, and in the context of many countries having made it from low-income to middle-income status, there is much discussion of the ‘middle-income trap’. Some books on the challenges of China's current economic development explicitly place it in the context of overcoming the middle-income trap (for example, Woo et al., 2012; David Shambaugh, 2016; Lewin, Kenney and Murmann, 2016).

Through case studies in Asian countries such as China, India, the Philippines, South Korea, and Sri Lanka, with an examination of diverse industries (electronics, telecom equipment, mobile phones, pharmaceuticals, automobiles, and even garments) this book looks at facets of the processes of industrial catch-up (Nayyar, 2013) and life after catch-up in the context of GVCs. How do firms and economies upgrade and innovate and move from being suppliers to becoming headquarter economies (Baldwin, 2016) or, in GVC-terms, how do firms in these economies becoming lead firms?

Type
Chapter
Information
Development with Global Value Chains
Upgrading and Innovation in Asia
, pp. 1 - 19
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Introduction
  • Edited by Dev Nathan, Meenu Tewari, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Sandip Sarkar
  • Book: Development with Global Value Chains
  • Online publication: 01 November 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316221730.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • Edited by Dev Nathan, Meenu Tewari, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Sandip Sarkar
  • Book: Development with Global Value Chains
  • Online publication: 01 November 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316221730.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Edited by Dev Nathan, Meenu Tewari, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Sandip Sarkar
  • Book: Development with Global Value Chains
  • Online publication: 01 November 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316221730.001
Available formats
×