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4 - Dynasticism across Indian political parties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2016

Kanchan Chandra
Affiliation:
New York University
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Democratic Dynasties
State, Party and Family in Contemporary Indian Politics
, pp. 105 - 135
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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