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Conclusion

from Part III

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 February 2023

Dawood Ahmed
Affiliation:
Comparative Constitutions Project
Muhammad Zubair Abbasi
Affiliation:
University of Bradford
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Summary

In much of the Muslim world, the idea of incorporating Islam into a constitution seems to be very popular and, in some cases, understood as a panacea for political ills including, but not limited to, corruption and autocracy. It is sometimes assumed that adopting Islam in political life will resolve a range of social, political, and economic problems and therefore democratic demand for the incorporation of Islam during constitution-making moments often appears strong. This is not new: constitution making in the Muslim world since almost a century and a half earlier has sought to grapple with this tension where the adoption of “modern” constitutions must be blended and synchronized with Islamic concepts to remain legitimate and acceptable to the masses – so that the resulting outcome is an “Islamic” constitution.

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Chapter
Information
Democracy under God
Constitutions, Islam and Human Rights in the Muslim World
, pp. 185 - 190
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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