Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-lgdn2 Total loading time: 0.541 Render date: 2021-10-28T06:21:29.639Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Preface to the second edition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2014

Stephen James O’Meara
Affiliation:
Volcano, Hawaii
Get access

Summary

Cambridge University Press first published Deep-Sky Companions: The Messier Objects 15 or so years ago. It was the first in what is now a series of five Deep-Sky Companions volumes. The other books in the series are subtitled The Caldwell Objects, Hidden Treasures, The Secret Deep, and Southern Gems. Not only was The Messier Objects the first book in this series, but it was also the first deep-sky book I had ever written. As such it stands apart from the other volumes for several reasons.

First, many observers already had in their possession one or more books on the Messier objects, most notably The Messier Album by the late John H. Mallas and Evered Kreimer (Sky Publishing, Cambridge, MA, 1978), segments of which first appeared in Sky & Telescope magazine in the late 1960s, and Messier’s Nebulae and Star Clusters, 2nd edition, by the late Kenneth Glyn Jones (Cambridge University Press, 1991). Thus, I realized, my book would need a fresh approach.

For instance, to me, the most outstanding aspects of Glyn Jones’s book are the rich histories he presents on Messier and his contemporaries, as well as his summaries of historical observations of the “M” objects. Not wanting to duplicate this ef ort, I decided to minimize those aspects in my own book. I saw the Mallas and Kreimer book as having three strengths: (1) Kreimer’s beautiful photographs of the Messier objects taken through his 12 1/2-inch Cave rel ector from Prescott, Arizona; (2) Mallas’s pencil drawings of each M object as seen through a 4-inch f/15 Unitron refractor from his backyard in Covina, California; and (3) Harvard historian Owen Gingerich’s scholarly biography of Messier and his contemporary Pierre Méchain.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×