Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-4rdrl Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-16T09:00:40.198Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Works by David Foster Wallace

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2022

Clare Hayes-Brady
Affiliation:
University College Dublin
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Works by David Foster Wallace

“100-Word Statement,” Rolling Stone Magazine, December 30, 1999, p. 125.Google Scholar
“Adult World (I),” Esquire, July 1998, pp. 76–85.Google Scholar
“Adult World (II),” Esquire, July 1998, pp. 100–1.Google Scholar
“All That,” The New Yorker, December 6, 2009, www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/12/14/all-that-2.Google Scholar
“Another Example of the Porousness of Various Borders (VI): Projected but Not Improbable Transcript of Author’s Parents’ Marriage’s End, 1971,” McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, 3 (Summer/Autumn, 1999), n.p. Printed on spine.Google Scholar
The Best of the Prose Poem: An International Journal,” Rain Taxi, 6.1 (Spring 2001), 2224.Google Scholar
“Borges on the Couch,” The New York Times, November 7, 2004, http://tinyurl.com/nxamww.Google Scholar
Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (Boston: Little, Brown, 1999).Google Scholar
“Brief Interviews with Hideous Men – What They Talk About When They Talk About Themselves,” Harper’s Magazine, October 1998, pp. 41–56.Google Scholar
The Broom of the System (New York: Penguin, 1987).Google Scholar
“The Compliance Branch,” Harper’s Magazine, February 2008, https://harpers.org/archive/2008/02/the-compliance-branch/.Google Scholar
Consider the Lobster: Essays (New York: Little, Brown, 2005).Google Scholar
“Crash of’69,” Between C&D Magazine, Winter 1989, https://biblioklept.org/2010/11/29/crash-of-69-david-foster-wallace/.Google Scholar
The David Foster Wallace Reader, ed. Green, Karen and Pietsch, Michael (New York: Little, Brown, 2014).Google Scholar
“David Lynch Keeps His Head,” US Premiere Magazine, September 1996, www.lynchnet.com/lh/lhpremiere.html.Google Scholar
“Deciderization 2007 – A Special Report,” in Introduction to The Best American Essays, ed. Foster Wallace, David (New York: Mariner-Houghton Mifflin, 2007), pp. xiixxiv.Google Scholar
“Democracy and Commerce at the U.S. Open,” Tennis Magazine, September 1996.Google Scholar
“The Depressed Person,” Harper’s Magazine, January 1998, https://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/HarpersMagazine-1998-01-0059425.pdf.Google Scholar
E Unibus Pluram: Television and US Fiction,” The Review of Contemporary Fiction, 13.2 (Summer 1993), 151–94.Google Scholar
The Empty Plenum: David Markson’s Wittgenstein’s Mistress,” The Review of Contemporary Fiction, 10.2 (Summer 1990), 217–39.Google Scholar
Everything and More: A Compact History of ∞ (London: Orion Books, 2003).Google Scholar
“Exploring Inner Space: War Fever by J.G. Ballard,” The Washington Post, April 21, 1991, http://tinyurl.com/l4ulya.Google Scholar
Fate, Time and Language: An Essay on Free Will, eds. Cahn, Steven M. and Eckert, Maureen (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011).Google Scholar
“Federer as Religious Experience,” New York Times, August 20, 2006, http://tinyurl.com/rnhv9.Google Scholar
“Fictional Futures and the Conspicuously Young,” The Review of Contemporary Fiction, 8.3 (Autumn 1988), 3653.Google Scholar
“The Fifth Column – A Novel: Week Eleven,” The Village Voice, March 26, 1996, p. 50.Google Scholar
The Flexicon,” Parnassus, 23.1–2 (1998), 180–94.Google Scholar
“F/X Porn,” Waterstone’s Magazine, Winter/Spring 1998.Google Scholar
Girl with Curious Hair (New York: W. W. Norton, 1989).Google Scholar
“God Bless You, Mr. Franzen,” Harper’s Magazine, September 1996.Google Scholar
“Good Old Neon,” Handwritten Draft, David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, MS-5155, Container 24.2.Google Scholar
“Good People,” The New Yorker, February 5, 2007, http://tinyurl.com/qbgzrl.Google Scholar
“Greeting Card to David Markson,” David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Container 3, Folder 3.Google Scholar
“High Regret Ink,” Puncture, 35 (Spring 1996), 17–20.Google Scholar
On His Deathbed, Holding Your Hand, the Acclaimed New Young Off-Broadway Playwright’s Father Begs a Boon,” in Bestial Noise: The Tin House Fiction Reader (London: Bloomsbury, 2003) pp. 347–71.Google Scholar
“H.L. Hix’s Morte d’Author: An Autopsy,” Harvard Book Review (Spring 1991), 2–3.Google Scholar
“The Horror of Pretentiousness: The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker,” The Washington Post, February 19, 1990.Google Scholar
“Host,” The Atlantic Monthly, April 2005, www.theatlantic.com/doc/200504/wallace.Google Scholar
“Impediments to Passion,” Might Magazine, 7, Winter 1996. Later published as “Hail The Returning Dragon, Clothed in New Fire” in Shiny Adidas Tracksuits and the Death of Camp and Other Essays from Might Magazine (New York: Berkley Trade, 1998), pp. 1417.Google Scholar
Infinite Jest (Boston: Little, Brown, 1996).Google Scholar
Infinite Jest, Draft Materials, David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Containers 15.7, 16.6, 16.7.Google Scholar
“Inside,” The Amherst Review, XIII, 1985, 63–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
“Iris’ Story: An Inversion of Philosophical Skepticism: The Blindfold by Siri Hustvedt,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, May 24, 1992, p. M2.Google Scholar
“John Updike, Champion Literary Phallocrat, Drops One: Is This Finally the End for the Magnificent Narcissists?,” The New York Observer, October 13, 1997, https://observer.com/1997/10/john-updike-champion-literary-phallocrat-drops-one-is-this-finally-the-end-for-magnificent-narcissists/.Google Scholar
“Joseph Frank’s Dostoevsky,” Handwritten and Typescript Drafts, Research Materials, David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Container 4.12.Google Scholar
“Just Asking,” The Atlantic Monthly, November 1997, www.theatlantic.com/doc/200711/wallace-safety.Google Scholar
“Kenyon College Commencement Address,” The Economist 1843 Magazine, September 19, 2008 [2005], http://tinyurl.com/mfunbz.Google Scholar
“Late Night,” Playboy Magazine, June 1988.Google Scholar
“Laughing with Kafka,” Harper’s Magazine, July 1998, www.harpers.org/archive/1998/07/0059612.Google Scholar
“Letter to Didier Jacob,” David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Container 1, Folder 1.1.Google Scholar
“Letter to Michael Pietsch,” January 17, 1988, David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Container 1, Folder 1.1.Google Scholar
“Letter to Michael Pietsch,” June 22, 1992, Little, Brown and Company Collection of David Foster Wallace, Box 1–5, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Box 3, Folder 2.Google Scholar
“Letter to Michael Pietsch,” April 2, 2003, Little, Brown and Company Collection of David Foster Wallace, Box 1–5, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Box 3, Folder 5.Google Scholar
“Matters of Sense and Opacity,” Letter, The New York Times, August 2, 1987, sec. 7, p. 24.Google Scholar
McCain’s Promise (New York: Back Bay Books, 2008).Google Scholar
“Michael Martone’s Fort Wayne Is Seventh on Hitler’s List,” Harvard Book Review (Spring 1990), 12–13.Google Scholar
“Midwesternisms,” Notebook, David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Container 31.12.Google Scholar
“The Million-Dollar Tattoo: F.J. Fiederspiel’s Laura’s Skin,” New York Times Book Review, May 5, 1991, p. 20.Google Scholar
“Mr. Costigan in May,” Clarion (Spring 1985), 40.Google Scholar
Mr. Squishy,” pseudonym Elizabeth Klemm, McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, 5 (Autumn 2000), pp. 199248.Google Scholar
“The Nature of the Fun,” Fiction Writer Magazine, September 1998.Google Scholar
“Neither Adult Nor Entertainment,” US Premier, September 11, 1998.Google Scholar
“Nothing Happened,” Open City, 5 (1997), 63–68.Google Scholar
Oblivion: Stories (New York: Little, Brown, 2004).Google Scholar
“Order and Flux in Northampton,” Conjunctions, 17 (Autumn 1991), 91–118.Google Scholar
“Other Math,” Western Humanities Review (Summer 1987), pp. 287–89.Google Scholar
“Overlooked: Five Direly Underappreciated U.S. Novels>1960,” Salon, April 12, 1999, www.salon.com/1999/04/12/wallace/.1960,”+Salon,+April+12,+1999,+www.salon.com/1999/04/12/wallace/.>Google Scholar
The Pale King: An Unfinished Novel, ed. Pietsch, Michael (New York: Little, Brown, 2011).Google Scholar
The Pale King, Draft Materials, David Foster Wallace Papers, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Box 39.5.Google Scholar
“Passion, Digitally,” New York Times Magazine, September 29, 1996, www.nytimes.com/1996/09/29/magazine/passion-digitally.html.Google Scholar
“Peoria (4),” TriQuarterly, 112 (June 2002), 131–32.Google Scholar
“Peoria (9) ‘Whispering Pines,’” TriQuarterly, 112 (June 2002), 132–34.Google Scholar
The Planet Trillaphon As It Stands in Relation to The Bad Thing,” Tin House, 40 (Summer 2009), 2946.Google Scholar
“Pop Quiz,” Spelunker Flophouse, 1.4 (1997), 30–41.Google Scholar
“Presley as Paradigm: Dead Elvis: A Chronicle of Cultural Obsession by Greil Marcus,” LA Times, November 24, 1991, http://tinyurl.com/r5sydd.Google Scholar
“Quo Vadis – Introduction,” The Review of Contemporary Fiction, 16:1 (Spring 1996), 7–8.Google Scholar
“Rabbit Resurrected,” Harper’s Magazine, August 1992, https://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/HarpersMagazine-1992-08-0072766.pdf.Google Scholar
“A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life,” Ploughshares, Spring 1998, http://tinyurl.com/npa6sr.Google Scholar
Richard Taylor’s ‘Fatalism’ and the Semantics of Physical Modality”, in Cahn, Steven M. and Eckert, Maureen (eds.), Fate, Time, and Language: An Essay on Free Will (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011), pp. 141218.Google Scholar
“Rhetoric and Math Melodrama,” Science Magazine, December 22, 2000, http://tinyurl.com/ksyebd.Google Scholar
“Self-Harm as a Sort of Offering,” Mid-American Review XVIII, 2 (Spring 1998), 97–100.Google Scholar
“Several Birds,” The New Yorker, June 27, 1994, http://tinyurl.com/lb43np.Google Scholar
“Shipping Out: On the (Nearly Lethal) Comforts of a Luxury Cruise,” Harper’s Magazine, January 1996, https://harpers.org/archive/1996/01/shipping-out/.Google Scholar
Signifying Rappers: Rap and Race in the Urban Present, Co-authored with Mark Costello (New York: Ecco Press, 1990).Google Scholar
“Solomon Silverfish,” Sonora Review, 16 (Autumn 1987), 54–81. Republished in tribute edition, 55/56 (Summer 2009).Google Scholar
“The String Theory,” Esquire, September 17, 2008 [1996], www.esquire.com/features/sports/the-string-theory-0796.Google Scholar
String Theory: David Foster Wallace on Tennis (New York: Library of America, 2016).Google Scholar
A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again: Essays and Arguments (Boston: Little, Brown, 1997).Google Scholar
“Tennis, Trigonometry, Tornadoes,” Harper’s Magazine, December 1991, https://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/HarpersMagazine-1991-12-0000710.pdf.Google Scholar
“Tense Present: Democracy, English, and the Wars over Usage,” Harper’s Magazine, April 2001, https://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/HarpersMagazine-2001-04-0070913.pdf.Google Scholar
“Ticket to the Fair,” Harper’s Magazine, July 1994, https://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/HarpersMagazine-1994-07-0001729.pdf.Google Scholar
This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life (New York: Little, Brown, 2009).Google Scholar
Three Protrusions,” Grand Street, 42 (Spring 1992), 102–14.Google Scholar
“Tragic Cuban Émigré and a Tale of ‘The Door to Happiness’: The Doorman by Reinaldo Arenas,” The Philadelphia Enquirer Book Review, July 14, 1991.Google Scholar
“Wiggle Room,” The New Yorker, March 9, 2009, http://tinyurl.com/mf5dbl.Google Scholar
Yet Another Instance of the Porousness of Certain Borders (VIII),” McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, 1 (Autumn 1998), 199248.Google Scholar
“Yet Another Instance of the Porousness of Certain Borders (XII),” Esquire, November, 1998, n.p.Google Scholar
Yet Another Instance of the Porousness of Certain Borders (XXI),” Conjunctions, 28 (Spring 1997), www.conjunctions.com/print/article/david-foster-wallace-c28. Collected as “Yet Another Instance of the Porousness of Certain Borders (XI).”Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×