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9 - Comparing Methods for the Evaluation of Cluster Structures in Multidimensional Analyses

Concessive Constructions in Varieties of English

from Part III - Perspectives on Multifactorial Methods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2022

Ole Schützler
Affiliation:
Universität Leipzig
Julia Schlüter
Affiliation:
Universität Bamberg
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Summary

This chapter sets out by discussing the way in which multidimensional techniques and visualizations have been used to analyse linguistic data. While, for instance, multidimensional scaling and unrooted phenograms (or NeighborNets) have primarily been designed for exploratory purposes, the author argues that they are in fact regularly used to put linguistic assumptions or hypotheses to the test. Cluster goodness (in terms of internal coherence and external distance from other clusters) in such approaches are typically evaluated based on a two-dimensional visualization. The author compares the affordances and limitations of visual inspection with a quantitative set of metrics that directly relates to visual displays but adds a degree of precision not attained by the human eye. The empirical part of the paper applies both approaches to a study of concessive constructions in six varieties of English, based on spoken and written material from the International Corpus of English. The author suggests that the new metrics can be usefully applied to a variety of multidimensional techniques to endow them with a measure of objectivity.

Type
Chapter
Information
Data and Methods in Corpus Linguistics
Comparative Approaches
, pp. 259 - 288
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

Further Reading

Borg, Ingwer, and Patrick, J. F. Groenen. 2005. Modern Multidimensional Scaling. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
Everitt, Brian S., Landau, Sabine, Leese, Morven and Stahl, Daniel. 2011. Cluster Analysis. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moisl, Hermann. 2015. Cluster Analysis for Corpus Linguistics. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar

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