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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 August 2020

Brandon L. Bartels
Affiliation:
George Washington University, Washington DC
Christopher D. Johnston
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
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Curbing the Court
Why the Public Constrains Judicial Independence
, pp. 279 - 294
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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