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3 - Labor for Forests

European Expansion through Naval Stores

from Part I - Labor in Ethnohistorical Settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2022

David Griffith
Affiliation:
East Carolina University
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Summary

In the early 18th century, around 15,000 people fled southwestern Germany for the British Isles with the hopes that Queen Anne would send them to North America. Once they reached England, they established refugee camps near the Thames in and around London, raising fears of disease, competition of refugee artisans with locals, and other issues. Feeling the pressure, Queen Anne supported three resettlement schemes: one to shore up the Protestant presence in Ireland and two to produce naval stores (tar, pitch, turpentine, etc.) in North Carolina and New York. Naval stores were strategic materials used for shipbuilding and consequently European expansion around the world, yet their production involved onerous work in pine forests. The British, having denuded most of their forests for fuel and building materials, were dependent on Scandinavian sources for them. Although the two resettlement schemes targeting North America failed, they constituted early experiments with deploying immigrant labor for difficult, dangerous tasks in the New World.

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Chapter
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The Cultural Value of Work
Livelihoods and Migration in the World's Economies
, pp. 54 - 76
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Labor for Forests
  • David Griffith, East Carolina University
  • Book: The Cultural Value of Work
  • Online publication: 14 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009109000.006
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  • Labor for Forests
  • David Griffith, East Carolina University
  • Book: The Cultural Value of Work
  • Online publication: 14 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009109000.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Labor for Forests
  • David Griffith, East Carolina University
  • Book: The Cultural Value of Work
  • Online publication: 14 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009109000.006
Available formats
×