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Chapter 8 - Managing Corporate Responsibility (1973–1981)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2012

Archie B. Carroll
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
Kenneth J. Lipartito
Affiliation:
Florida International University
James E. Post
Affiliation:
Boston University
Patricia H. Werhane
Affiliation:
DePaul University, Chicago
Kenneth E. Goodpaster
Affiliation:
University of St Thomas, Minnesota
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Summary

By the mid-1970s, business executives began talking about “managing” corporate responsibility issues, not just “fighting fires.” Companies designed systems to address categories of significant issues (workplace discrimination, consumer protection, environmental protection) and developed methodologies for anticipating issues, formulating policy, and advocating corporate positions in the public square and the political arena. The idea that a corporation's responsibilities extended to various constituencies or stakeholders flourished, and many businesses and trade organizations embraced a multi-constituency model of business in society.

The social transformation of American business that began with the movements of the 1960s gained full force in the 1970s. New expectations meant new demands and the 1970s became a decade of deep change in American political and economic life. Advocacy groups felt empowered to press their claims. Business would be dramatically transformed. It became what one astute observer described as a “new reformation” that involved a “rewriting of the corporate social charter.”

Type
Chapter
Information
Corporate Responsibility
The American Experience
, pp. 264 - 300
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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