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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2017

Brady Wagoner
Affiliation:
Aalborg University, Denmark
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The Constructive Mind
Bartlett's Psychology in Reconstruction
, pp. 206 - 222
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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