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9 - The United Kingdom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2015

Brian Galligan
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Scott Brenton
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
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Chapter
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Constitutional Conventions in Westminster Systems
Controversies, Changes and Challenges
, pp. 173 - 188
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

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Hazell, Robert 2010. The Conservative – Liberal Democrat Agenda for Constitutional and Political Reform. London: The Constitution Unit.Google Scholar
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House of Lords Constitution Committee 2011. The Cabinet Manual. HL107.
House of Lords Constitution Committee 2014. The Constitutional Implications of Coalition Government. HL 130.
Joint Parliamentary Committee on Conventions 2006. Conventions of the UK Parliament. HL 265; HC 212.
Judges’ Council 2013. Guide to Judicial Conduct, 2nd edition. Judiciary of England and Wales.
Judicial Executive Board 2012. Guidance to Judges on Appearances before Select Committees.
King, Jeff 2015. ‘Parliament's Role Following Declarations of Incompatibility under the Human Rights Act’, in Hunt, M., Hooper, H. and Yowell, P. (eds.), Parliaments and Human Rights: Redressing the Democratic Deficit. Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
Klug, Francesca 2015. A Magna Carta for Humanity, Homing in on Human Rights. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Labour Party Manifesto 1997. New Labour because Britain Deserves Better.
Ministry of Justice 2007. The Governance of Britain. Cm 7170.
Ministry of Justice 2009. Review of Executive Royal Prerogative Powers.
Ministry of Justice 2013. Report to the Joint Committee on Human Rights on the Government's Response to Human Rights Judgements 2012–13.
Phillipson, Gavin 2013. ‘“Historic” Commons’ Syria vote: the constitutional significance (Part I)’ ‘Part II: the Way Forward’, UK Const. L. Blog (19 September 2013; 29 November 2013).
Prime Minister's Office, Deputy Prime Minister's Office, Cabinet Office 2010. Coalition Agreement for Stability and Reform. London: Cabinet Office.
Russell, Meg 2011. House Full: Time to Get a Grip on Lords Appointments. London: The Constitution Unit.Google Scholar
UK Government 2013. Memorandum of Understanding and Supplementary Agreements between the UK Government, Scottish Ministers, Welsh Ministers and Northern Ireland Executive. Cm 7864.

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