Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-rcd7l Total loading time: 0.609 Render date: 2021-10-22T22:21:26.968Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

7 - Change at the top: connecting political and managerial transitions with performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2011

George Boyne
Affiliation:
Cardiff Business School
Oliver James
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
Peter John
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
Nicolai Petrovsky
Affiliation:
University of Kentucky
Kieran Walshe
Affiliation:
Manchester University
Gill Harvey
Affiliation:
Manchester University
Pauline Jas
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Get access

Summary

Introduction

There is relatively little research that systematically assesses how changes in political or managerial leadership contribute to public service performance, and even less on the question of how the effectiveness of these leaders is related to their use of performance information. This gap in knowledge is surprising because the idea that new leadership can transform the performance of public services has not only been seen as theoretically important for a long time, it has also become a popular policy nostrum in recent years. Local authorities have increasingly tried to recruit new (and, by assumption, better) political and managerial leaders. The idea of effective leadership has been a key theme of recent UK initiatives, with many new bodies with leadership in their titles, including a Leadership Centre for Local Government, a National College for School Leadership and a Leadership Foundation for Higher Education. Moreover, leadership is now a key competency for senior civil servants. The common denominator of these reforms is an attempt to improve the leadership capacity in local government, health bodies, education and other public services to improve the services these organisations provide.

Debates on the need for better leadership in UK local government reflect a longstanding concern with the ‘calibre’ of councillors and officers (Dearlove 1979). The basic argument is that the succession of political and managerial elites may reinvigorate public service providers and their performance (Boyne and Dahya 2002; Boyne 2003).

Type
Chapter
Information
Connecting Knowledge and Performance in Public Services
From Knowing to Doing
, pp. 128 - 144
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Aidt, T. S. (2000). ‘Economic Voting and Information’, Electoral Studies 19(2–3): 349–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andrews, R., Boyne, G. A. and Enticott, G.(2006). ‘Performance Failure in the Public Sector: Misfortune or Mismanagement?’, Public Management Review 8(2): 273–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Commission, Audit (2008). Tougher at the Top?London: Audit Commission.Google Scholar
Bass, B. M. (1990). ‘From Transactional to Transformational Leadership: Learning to Share the Vision’, Organizational Dynamics 18(3): 19–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bertelli, A. M. and L. E. Lynn, Jr. ( 2006). Madison's Managers: Public Administration and the Constitution. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Boyne, G. A. (2003). ‘Sources of Public Service Improvement: A Critical Review and Research Agenda’, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 13(3): 367–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyne, G. A. and Dahya, J.(2002). ‘Executive Succession and the Performance of Public Organizations’, Public Administration 80(1): 179–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N.(2008). Does Public Service Performance Affect Top Management Turnover? Public Services Programme Discussion Paper 0802. Swindon: Economic and Social Research Council.Google Scholar
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N. (2009a). ‘Democracy and Government Performance: Holding Incumbents Accountable in English Local Governments’, Journal of Politics 71(4): 1273–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N. (2009b). ‘Party Control, Party Competition and Service Performance’, Cardiff University: typescript.
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N. (2009c). ‘Managerial Succession and Organizational Success: When Do New Chief Executives Make a Difference?’, Cardiff University: typescript.
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N. (2010a). ‘Does Political Change Affect Senior Management Turnover? An Empirical Analysis of Top-Tier Local Authorities in England’, Public Administration 88(1): 136–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N. (2010b). ‘Does Public Service Performance Affect Top Management Turnover?’, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory.
Boyne, G. A., James, O., John, P. and Petrovsky, N. (2010c). ‘Top Management Turnover and Organizational Performance: A Test of a Contingency Model’, Public Administration Review.
Clarke, H. D., Sanders, D., Stewart, M. C. and Whiteley, P. (2004). Political Choice in Britain. Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dahl, R. A. (1956). A Preface to Democratic Theory. University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Dearlove, J. (1979). The Reorganization of British Local Government. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Denhardt, R. B. (1984). Theories of Public Organization. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
Fiedler, F. E. (1996). ‘Research on Leadership Selection and Training: One View of the Future’, Administrative Science Quarterly 41(2): 241–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finer, H. (1941). ‘Administrative Responsibility in Democratic Government’, Public Administration Review 1(4): 335–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Friedrich, C. J. (1940). ‘Public Policy and the Nature of Administrative Responsibility’, Public Policy 1: 3–24.Google Scholar
Hannan, M. T. and Freeman, J.(1977). ‘The Population Ecology of Organizations’, American Journal of Sociology 82(5): 929–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hicklin, A. K. (2004). ‘Network Stability: Opportunities or Obstacles?’, Public Organization Review 4(2): 121–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hill, G. C. (2005). ‘The Effects of Managerial Succession on Organizational Performance’, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 15(4): 585–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hooijberg, R. and Choi, J.(2001). ‘The Impact of Organizational Characteristics on Leadership Effectiveness Models: An Examination of Leadership in a Private and Public Sector Organization’, Administration & Society 33(4): 403–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
James, O. and John, P.(2007). ‘Performance and Electoral Support for Incumbent Local Government’, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 17(4): 567–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaufman, H. (1991). Time, Chance, and Organizations: Natural Selection in a Perilous Environment (2nd edn.). Chatham, NJ: Chatham House Publishers.Google Scholar
Lupia, A. and McCubbins, M. D.(1998). The Democratic Dilemma: Can Citizens Learn What They Really Need to Know?Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Meier, K. J. and L. J. O'Toole, Jr. (2001). ‘Managerial Strategies and Behavior in Networks: A Model with Evidence from U.S. Public Education’, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 11(3): 271–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meier, K. J. and L. J. O'Toole, Jr. (2002). ‘Public Management and Organizational Performance: The Effect of Managerial Quality’, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 21(4): 629–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meier, K. J. and L. J. O'Toole, Jr. (2006). Bureaucracy in a Democratic State: A Governance Perspective. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Moe, T. M. (1997). ‘The Positive Theory of Public Bureaucracy’, in Mueller, D. C. (ed.), Perspectives on Public Choice: A Handbook. Cambridge University Press, pp. 455–80.Google Scholar
Petrovsky, N. (2010). ‘The Role of Leadership’, in Ashworth, R., , G.Boyne, A. and Entwistle, T. (eds.) Public Service Improvement: Theories and Evidence. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Polidano, C. (1999). ‘The Bureaucrat Who Fell Under a Bus: Ministerial Responsibility, Executive Agencies and the Derek Lewis Affair in Britain’, Governance 12(2): 201–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rainey, H. G. and Wechsler, B.(1988). ‘Executive-Level Transition: Toward a Conceptual Framework’, Public Productivity Review 12(1): 45–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rowe, W. G., A. A. Cannella, Jr., Rankin, D. and Gorman, D.(2005). ‘Leadership Succession and Organizational Performance: Integrating the Common-Sense, Ritual Scapegoating and Vicious-Circle Succession Theories’, Leadership Quarterly 16(2): 197–219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stogdill, R. M. (1950). ‘Leadership, Membership and Organization’, Psychological Bulletin 47(1): 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stoker, G. and Wilson, D. (2004). British Local Government into the 21st Century. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whittington, R. (1988). ‘Environmental Structure and Theories of Strategic Choice’, Journal of Management Studies 25(6): 521–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wintrobe, R. (1997). ‘Modern Bureaucratic Theory’, in Mueller, D. C. (ed.), Perspectives on Public Choice: A Handbook. Cambridge University Press, pp. 429–54.Google Scholar
Wood, B. D. and Waterman, R. W.(1994). Bureaucratic Dynamics: The Role of Bureaucracy in a Democracy. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar
3
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×