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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 September 2009

Patrick Saint-Dizier
Affiliation:
Institut de Recherche en Informatique, Toulouse
Evelyn Viegas
Affiliation:
Brandeis University, Massachusetts
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Summary

This volume on computational lexical semantics emerged from a workshop on lexical semantics issues organized in Toulouse, France, in January 1992. The chapters presented here are extended versions of the original texts.

Lexical semantics is now becoming a major research area in computational linguistics and it is playing more of a central role in various types of applications involving natural language parsers as well as generators.

Lexical semantics covers a wide spectrum of problematics from different disciplines, from psycholinguistics to knowledge representation and to computer architecture, which makes this field relatively difficult to perceive as a whole. The goal of this volume is to present the state of the art in lexical semantics from a computational linguistics point of view and from a range of perspectives: psycholinguistics, linguistics (formal and applied), computational linguistics, and application development. The following points are particularly developed in this volume:

  • psycholinguistics: mental lexicons, access to lexical items, form of lexical items, links between concepts and words, and lexicalizing operations;

  • linguistics and formal aspects of lexical semantics: lexical semantics relations, prototypes, conceptual representations, event structure, argument structure, and lexical redundancy;

  • knowledge representation: systems of rules, treatment of type coercion, aspects of inheritance, and relations between linguistics and world knowledge;

  • applications: creation and maintenance of large-size lexicons, the role of the lexicon in parsing and generation, lexical knowledge bases, and acquisition of lexical data;

  • operational aspects: processing models and architecture of lexical systems.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1995

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