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Part III - Lexical databases

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 September 2009

Patrick Saint-Dizier
Affiliation:
Institut de Recherche en Informatique, Toulouse
Evelyn Viegas
Affiliation:
Brandeis University, Massachusetts
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Summary

Another current major issue in lexical semantics is the definition and the construction of real-size lexical databases that will be used by parsers and generators in conjunction with a grammatical system. Word meaning, terminological knowledge representation and extraction of knowledge in machine readable dictionaries are the main topics addressed. They really represent the backbone of a lexical semantics knowledge base construction.

The first chapter, “Lexical semantics and terminological knowledge representation” by Gerrit Burkert, shows the practical and formal inadequacies of semantic networks for representing knowledge, and the advantages of using a term subsumption language. In a first stage, this document shows how several aspects of word meaning can be adequately described using a term subsumption language. Then, some extensions are proposed that make the system more suitable for lexical semantics. Formal aspects are strongly motivated by several examples borrowed from an in-depth study of terminological knowledge extraction, which is a rather challenging area for lexical semantics.

“Word meaning between lexical and conceptual structure”, by Peter Gerstl, presents a method and a system to introduce world-knowledge or domain-dependent knowledge in a lexicon. The meaning of a word is derived from general lexical information on the one hand and from ontological knowledge on the other hand. The notion of semantic scope is explored on an empirical basis by analyzing in a systematic way the influences involved in natural language expressions. This component has been integrated into the Lilog system developed at IBM Stuttgart.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1995

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  • Lexical databases
  • Edited by Patrick Saint-Dizier, Institut de Recherche en Informatique, Toulouse, Evelyn Viegas, Brandeis University, Massachusetts
  • Book: Computational Lexical Semantics
  • Online publication: 29 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511527227.011
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  • Lexical databases
  • Edited by Patrick Saint-Dizier, Institut de Recherche en Informatique, Toulouse, Evelyn Viegas, Brandeis University, Massachusetts
  • Book: Computational Lexical Semantics
  • Online publication: 29 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511527227.011
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Lexical databases
  • Edited by Patrick Saint-Dizier, Institut de Recherche en Informatique, Toulouse, Evelyn Viegas, Brandeis University, Massachusetts
  • Book: Computational Lexical Semantics
  • Online publication: 29 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511527227.011
Available formats
×