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Chapter 2 - Mistaking EEG Changes for Epilepsy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2018

Dieter Schmidt
Affiliation:
Epilepsy Research Group, Free University of Berlin
William O. Tatum
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston
Steven Schachter
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston
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Common Epilepsy Pitfalls
Case-Based Learning
, pp. 25 - 42
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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